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Posts Tagged ‘vice presidential debate’

UPDATED! 2008 VP debate numbers far exceeded those of 2012; Paul Ryan’s ‘Sarah Palin moment’

Posted by Dr. Fay on October 13, 2012

UPDATE:

From a particularly good writeup by Gayle Lynn Falkenthal, at the Washington Times:

SAN DIEGO, October 13, 2012 – Whether you think Joe Biden got the best of Paul Ryan on Thursday night or not, they were no match for Sarah Palin when it comes to ruling the TV ratings.

And so far, Palin has gotten the better of Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, too

The total number of viewers for Thursday’s vice presidential debate when adding all 12 broadcast and cable network audiences together is 51.4 million viewers according to the Nielsen company, the organization that measures television ratings. This is far below the 60 million some people breathlessly predicted.

It pales in comparison to the 70 million people who tuned in to see the much-anticipated showdown between Joe Biden and Alaska Governor Sarah “Can I call you Joe?” Palin in 2008.

Palin and Biden’s debate audience also topped the 67 million who watched the first presidential debate of 2012 between President Barack Obama and Governor Mitt Romney.

Fox News drew the largest overall audience with 10 million viewers for the 9 to 10:30 p.m. Eastern debate. This is just slightly less than Fox’s audience for the first Presidential debate between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. CBS claims the largest broadcast audience with 8.31 million viewers, just edging out ABC’s 8.29 million viewers. NBC was third with 7.85 million viewers. MSNBC recorded 4.37 million viewers, followed by CNN with 4.14 million.

Overall, the viewership is down significantly from the network audiences for the Biden – Palin Debate. ABC drew 13.1 million viewers, NBC 12.8 million and CBS 11.1 million.

Most viewers on Thursday were over 55 years old, 26.7 million, compared to only 7.1 million between the ages of 18 to 34.

It’s important to note that Nielsen does not measure the number of people watching the debate on television in offices, bars or other locations; and it does not measure anyone watching online, which would add millions of viewers to the total. Many of these viewers were likely in the younger age group not watching in great numbers on TV.

Read more.

ORIGINAL ARTICLE:

The numbers are in for viewership of the Ryan/Biden debate.  And they don’t compare to those of the Palin/Biden debate in 2008.

Scott Collins at the Los Angeles Times writes:

Plenty of viewers wanted to see Vice President Joe Bidenface off against GOP challenger Paul D. Ryan Thursday night.

But neither man has the pull of Sarah Palin.

According to Nielsen, a total of 51.4 million total viewers watched the 90-minute Biden-Ryan debate moderated by Martha Raddatz and carried on 12 networks.

That was an impressive number but nowhere near the nearly 70 million who saw Biden and Palin duel in 2008.

Fox News came out on top of all the networks offering this year’s sole vice presidential debate, with 10 million total viewers.

That was more than MSNBC (4.4 million) and CNN (4.1 million) combined.

Among broadcasters, CBS was No. 1 with 8.3 million viewers.

From the Associated Press article at the Washington Post:

Paul Ryan debating Joe Biden wasn’t quite the same television draw as Sarah Palin versus Biden was four years ago.

An estimated 51.4 million people watched Ryan, the Republican challenger, debate Vice President Biden, a Democrat, on Thursday night, said Nielsen, the company that measures television audiences.

Four years ago, just under 70 million people watched Palin debate Biden. But that was unusual; it was a debate that had more viewers than even any presidential contest dating back to 1992.

Excluding 2008, the Biden-Ryan debate had a larger audience than any other vice presidential debate since George Bush was matched up with Geraldine Ferraro in 1984, Nielsen said.

Last week, an estimated 67 million TV viewers saw President Barack Obama in his first debate against Mitt Romney.

Paul Ryan also had a moment similar to one Sarah Palin had during one of her debates as a gubernatorial candidate in Alaska.   During that debate, when her opponents were squabbling between themselves, she said the following, as reported by Joel Millman at the Wall Street Journal.

“Binkley and Murkowski went after each other, almost ignoring her, bickering back and forth,” Mr. Clark remembers. Finally, he continues, “Ms. Palin interrupted and said ‘Don’t Alaskans deserve a better discourse than that?’ It became the defining moment of the campaign.”

A similar memorable moment during Thursday’s Ryan/Biden debate was this one, as reported in the Associated Press article at abc13.

“I know you’re under a lot of duress to make up for lost ground, but I think people would be better served if we don’t interrupt each other.”

We applaud Ryan’s performance on Thursday night as he demonstrated grace under pressure and presented the facts against repeated lies by Biden.  However, Governor Palin’s performance against Biden was a stronger win, and of course, no one else has her charisma and the ability to deliver zingers with a smile.

Here is a compilation of moments from some of her debates as a gubernatorial candidate in Alaska in 2006 that also demonstrate Governor Palin’s prowess in the debate arena.

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See also:

Palin Proved to Be Formidable Foe in Alaska Debates

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UPDATED! Gov. Palin talks to O’Reilly, Cavuto, and Hannity about the Ryan/Biden debate

Posted by Dr. Fay on October 12, 2012

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Paul Scicchitano AT NewsMax reported on the O’Reilly interview:

Former GOP vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin recalled thumbing through a stack of note cards, mostly on foreign policy issues, in preparation for her 2008 debate against Joe Biden. An attached note from the McCain campaign instructed “Memorize these.”

Therein may have been one of the problems for the ill-fated campaign.

“It all had to do with for the most part (with) foreign policy issues which were not top of the ticket in terms of issues at the time,” recalled Palin, appearing on Fox’s “The O’Reilly Factor” in advance of Thursday’s vice presidential debate between her former rival and Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan.

“We should have talked more about the economy and how Barack Obama would lessen opportunities for economic recovery at the time,” Palin told host Bill O’Reilly.

“Instead, I was asked to memorize a whole lot of things about foreign policy that weren’t as relevant in the voters’ minds as the economy would.”

After looking at the note cards for a number of days, Palin tossed them aside “finally realizing how inconsistent and a bit convoluted some of the answers were,” she explained.

“You know at some point the candidate just has to kind of chuck those and decide ‘I will stand on my own record, my own philosophy, my own principles, making sure that they coincide with the top of the ticket’s views and we’ll go from there in the debate.’”

Read more.
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Although her interview with Hannity has been more widely reported on, Governor Palin introduced her musk ox analogy of the Ryan/Biden debate in the Cavuto interview.  She went on to respond to questions about economics and Biden’s mention of her name with his “death panels” remarks.  Gov. Palin clarified that the “death panel” of 15 bureaucrats is different from what Ryan had been talking about when Biden interjected his remark.    Governor Palin also critiqued Ryan’s and Biden’s performances and described Biden as the “attack dog” sent out by the Obama camp to raise some of the issues  that Obama failed to do in his interview with Romney.

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Excerpted from the FOX News transcript:

SEAN HANNITY, HOST OF “HANNITY”: We’re live in Danville, Kentucky where just a short time ago the first and only vice presidential debate concluded. Joining me now is somebody who was, well, mentioned by the vice president tonight and that is former Republican vice presidential nominee, Governor Sarah Palin. Governor, welcome back to the program.

SARAH PALIN, FORMER ALASKA GOVERNOR: Thanks so much, Sean.

HANNITY: All right, let’s get your initial thoughts. I don’t think Joe Biden smiled as uncontrollably in your debate and nor do I think he was as rude and condescending. I’m hearing from a lot of people, on Twitter, e-mails all over the place that this did not go over very well tonight. Your thoughts?

PALIN: Well, I believe that Joe Biden was sent in as the attack dog in this debate to compensate for President Obama’s atrocious showing in his own debate where he was aloof and arrogant and disconnected and really disengaged with what is very important to the American voter.

That was the representation of Obama in his own debate last week. So I believe that Joe Biden was sent in to try to compensate for that, but really tough format, Sean, for someone like Paul Ryan or anyone else up against Joe Biden when the moderator allowed one candidate to absolutely run rough shot over the conversation over the opponent.

That’s a tough format. It reminded me I just told Neil Cavuto of watching a Muscat run across the tundra with somebody underfoot and in this case when it came to style it was Paul Ryan underfoot because of the moderator allowing Biden to do the interrupting, to kind of take control of the conversation.

HANNITY: I would say that maybe there is a lesson to be learned here is that if Martha ever gets married again that probably Paul Ryan should go to her wedding, which I thought was wrong in the first place. Because there’s obviously a conflict of interest.

And it was interesting that every time she seemed to interrupt was well, to bail out Joe Biden and shut down Paul Ryan. But I don’t think it impacted the debate. Some things might have gone unnoticed, governor that I want to get your thoughts on.

When Joe Biden talked about they’re down on America. They bet against America. Holding hostage was another term that he used. Now this is a — he’s working for a president lecturing the country on civility. I wanted to get your take on those particular terms that he used tonight meaning the vice president.

PALIN: You know that inciting-type rhetoric that did not go over well. I believe with those who are rational American voters just wanting to deal with facts and what the true state of the union is and we know the state of the union is not very good right now because of the failed policies of Obama and Biden.

I think what you’re going to see tonight is along with that inciting rhetoric of Joe Biden’s what you’re going to see as a result of that is the mainstream media tomorrow morning will probably want to give a quote/unquote “win” to Joe Biden based on style.

Because Joe Biden came across as passionate having used rhetoric like you just mentioned. Unfortunately, Joe Biden is quite passionate about all of the wrong things. He’s passionate about growing government assuming government is the answer.

Whereas Paul Ryan, more subdued perhaps, I believe more pulled together. But what Paul Ryan was trying to explain is that Republican platform is built on this notion of empowering the individual, middle class.

Just the average everyday American who isn’t looking for government to come in and take more and more of what the fruits of our labor is then redistribute it according to some far away, faceless, politician priorities.

HANNITY: Well, you know, but there are certain lines that I thought were very, very interesting, actually got some audience reaction tonight. And you know we’ve got to build our cars in Finland? You know, have our windmills built in China?

The $90 billion that were wasted on so called green energy jobs? Where are the five million jobs that they had promised? Unemployment rate in Scranton, Pennsylvania went up significantly 8.5 percent to 10 percent.

You know, it’s very interesting. The piggy bank ObamaCare line. Hand in cookie jar. Then, of course he laid out the facts America’s not better off than it was four years ago.

Fewer Americans working, $6 trillion in debt and that he’s offering a very different vision and very serious, very methodical, very intelligent way to the American people. What does the country want?

PALIN: Right, what you’re suggesting there is the substance of the arguments made tonight. How important the substance was, not so much the style. I honestly think at this stage of the race, people are not so obsessed with who’s going to come across more intelligent or more passionate based on words, terminology used, but what is the substance?

What is behind their beliefs, their policies? What is their own record? What I was hoping is that Paul Ryan would have the opportunity to bring up Joe Biden’s energy record and how he’s been so opposed to domestic drilling of our resources and development here on and within our own shores.

You know, it was Joe Biden who 30 some years ago actually voted against the TransAlaska Oil Pipeline, which has dumped 18 billion barrels of good, clean energy into American markets.

Yet, Joe Biden opposed it back then and opposes capping our own resources today. That is why you can see the cost of energy so sky high affecting every good, every service in America.

HANNITY: Well, all I can say is I can’t wait to get back to our studio tomorrow night and montage Joe Biden and his facial expressions all throughout the debate.

I think that’ll be a big story by the time we get back. There is was instant poll I saw that had Ryan ahead. Every focus group I’m hearing from did not like the tone, the condescension, the arrogance, and the interruption of the vice president.

So we’re going to watch very closely. Governor Palin, great to see you as always. Thank you so much for being with us.

PALIN: Thank you, Sean. Let me remind you one thing too though. The truth told can’t be all lies when can invent. When Joe Biden told some truths about debt panels, but he told it out of context with an intention to skew what the true meaning and the truth behind the policy issues are. That’s as bad as actually telling a lie so just keep that in mind when you talk about the verbiage that Joe Biden chose to use tonight.

Read more. 
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Sarah Palin thinks Obama has reason to be nervous about the VP debate tonight

Posted by Dr. Fay on October 11, 2012

Video retrieved from sarahnettoo.

Governor Palin talked with Megyn Kelly this morning about the Ryan/Biden vice presidential debate tonight.  Laura Byrne at the Daily Caller has a good writeup of the interview:

“I think who’s nervous tonight is Barack Obama,” Palin told Fox News Channel’s Megyn Kelly. ” [Obama] certainly wants to see the debate shift in terms of attention being deflected from his poor performance, his arrogance, his aloofness, his disconnection that he really exuded in his own debate performance last week.”

The former Alaska governor admitted she does not reminisce about her own debate with Vice President Joe Biden four years ago.

“I’ve never seen clips of the debate. I’ve never watched any of those reruns from four years ago, from the acceptance speech to the debate or anything. No, life goes on. You move forward, and I don’t rehash the past,” Palin said.

Palin said her debate prep was intense, with aides handing her stacks of cards filled with information about running mate John McCain’s voting record.

“Campaign operatives wanted me to memorize many, many, many, in fact all of those facts and pieces of data,  so that my message would coincide with John McCain’s. At the end of the day, though, that VP debater has just got to be themselves.”

Read more.

As the 2012 debate approaches, there has been a lot of speculation on how Ryan’s performance will compare with Governor Palin’s in 2008.  Politico posted what appears to be a flashback article on  the 4th anniversary of the Palin/Biden debate.  In his review of past vice presidential debates, David Jackson at USA Today wrote:

2008 — Perhaps the most anticipated debate in political history, certainly among vice presidential contests.

The fascination with the suddenly famous Sarah Palin — going up against veteran Biden — drew some 70 million television viewers, the largest audience ever for a vice presidential debate.

“Can I call you Joe?” asked the first-term Alaska governor during the opening handshake.

But there is nothing like seeing the Palin/Biden debate for oneself.    Here is the full Palin/Biden debate as shown on CSPAN1.

Video retrieved from CSPAN.

The transcript of the 2008 vice presidential debate can be found here.

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Study: Gender Stereotypes in Media Coverage of Palin in 2008 Election Could Have Affected Voter Decisions

Posted by Dr. Fay on July 7, 2012

Scientific validation of what we already knew to be true.  From an article by Stacy Forster at University of Wisconsin – Madison News:

News coverage of Palin, then the Republican governor of Alaska, not only significantly outweighed that received by Biden, then a U.S. senator from Delaware, was markedly different in substance and across media, according to a new study of media coverage of the vice presidential candidates.

Coverage of Palin was more likely to include references to her family, physical appearance and social issues, particularly in newspapers and by political blogs, while coverage of Biden dealt more with foreign policy and the economy.

“Each of these differences could have had important influences on public opinion formation and the public’s voting decisions in this particular race,” write Leticia Bode, a former graduate student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who is now an assistant professor at Georgetown University, and Valerie M. Hennings, an assistant professor at Iowa State University, in the study published in the journal Politics & Policy. She conducted the research while at UW-Madison.

“Without an examination of vice presidential contests, our understanding of the intersection of political communication and the experience of women as political candidates is incomplete,” Bode and Hennings write. “If gender stereotypes in media coverage have the ability to negatively affect women candidates, this calls into question the American political system’s ability to produce elected representatives in a fair and democratic manner.”

Bode and Hennings tested three theories: The amount of coverage Palin received was greater than Biden; gender stereotypes would be reflected in the substance of coverage and emerge on such issues as family, electability, policy issues and physical appearance; and the amount and substance of coverage Palin and Biden received would differ across media.

They performed a content analysis that included coverage from Aug. 16 to Nov. 11, 2008, the period just before the Democratic National Convention to the week after the general election. News coverage mentioning the candidates was gleaned from the New York Times, the Washington Post and USA Today; transcripts from the three major broadcast networks’ evening broadcasts, as well as the equivalent periods on CNN and Fox News; and entries on nearly 400 political blogs.

The research showed that the vice presidential race in 2008 was in itself unique because of the attention it received. Discussion about McCain selecting Palin accounted for 7 percent of all television election coverage of the 2008 campaign, while the debate between Palin and Biden was the most-watched vice presidential debate in U.S. history, attracting nearly 70 million viewers.

In addition, the authors said, the race was especially novel because of Palin’s selection as the first woman on a Republican presidential ticket.

The high level of interest in her candidacy was reflected in the volume of coverage that went her way. The authors found that the average number of stories a day in overall coverage was 36 for Palin, compared with 14.9 for Biden. On television, Palin was the subject of 8.8 stories a day compared with 4.6 for Biden; in newspapers, it was 15 compared with 8.2 stories a day, and on political blogs, 14.2 compared with 3.2 stories a day.

In that coverage, the authors found evidence of gender stereotypes, with stories mentioning her family, physical appearance and positions on social issues; this trend was more pronounced on television. However, on issues that might be considered “women’s issues,” such as health care or education, Biden received more coverage.

“Each of these differences could have had important influences on public opinion formation and the public’s voting decisions in this particular race,” the authors write. “If future research finds similar differences in coverage in other races, the implications could significantly affect the election process, particularly for female candidates.”

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