Sarah Palin Information Blog

Sarah Palin Web Brigade

  • Upcoming Palin Events

  • Sarah Palin’s Endorsees

  • Sarah Palin Channel

  • Amazing America

  • The Undefeated

  • ‘Stars Earn Stripes’

  • ‘Game Change’ Lies Exposed

  • Good Tidings and Great Joy: Protecting the Heart of Christmas

  • Our Sarah: Made in Alaska

  • America by Heart: Reflections on Family, Faith, and Flag

  • Going Rogue: An American Life

  • Other Sarah Palin Info Sources

  • Login/RSS

  • Governor Palin on Twitter

  • @SarahPalinUSA

    Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.

  • Governor Palin on Facebook

  • SarahPAC Notes

  • RSS SarahPAC Notes

    • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.
  • SPWB on Facebook

  • SPWB on Twitter

  • @SarahPalinLinks

    Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.

  • Join the SPWB Twibe!

  • Posts by Date

    April 2019
    S M T W T F S
    « Jan    
     123456
    78910111213
    14151617181920
    21222324252627
    282930  
  • Categories

  • Archives

  • __________________________________________
  • Top Posts & Pages

  • __________________________________________
  • Recent Posts

  • Recent Comments

  • __________________________________________

Posts Tagged ‘Memorial Day’

Remembering Those Who Fought and Died in Our Place

Posted by Sarah Palin Web Brigade on May 28, 2012

Photo retrieved from ABMC.gov

Originally known as Decoration Day,  May 30  was established as a day to remember those who died in the American Civil War.  After World War I, Memorial Day came to be the day  we remember the American dead of all the wars our country has been  involved in.  In 1971, Congress  established Memorial Day as a national holiday and changed its observance to the last Monday in May,  resulting in a three-day holiday weekend.

Here are excerpts from  sites with information about the history of Memorial Day.

From USMemorialDay.org:

Memorial Day, originally called Decoration Day, is a day of remembrance for those who have died in our nation’s service. There are many stories as to its actual beginnings, with over two dozen cities and towns laying claim to being the birthplace of Memorial Day. There is also evidence that organized women’s groups in the South were decorating graves before the end of the Civil War: a hymn published in 1867, “Kneel Where Our Loves are Sleeping” by Nella L. Sweet carried the dedication “To The Ladies of the South who are Decorating the Graves of the Confederate Dead” (Source: Duke University’s Historic American Sheet Music, 1850-1920). While Waterloo N.Y. was officially declared the birthplace of Memorial Day by President Lyndon Johnson in May 1966, it’s difficult to prove conclusively the origins of the day. It is more likely that it had many separate beginnings; each of those towns and every planned or spontaneous gathering of people to honor the war dead in the 1860’s tapped into the general human need to honor our dead, each contributed honorably to the growing movement that culminated in Gen Logan giving his official proclamation in 1868. It is not important who was the very first, what is important is that Memorial Day was established. Memorial Day is not about division. It is about reconciliation; it is about coming together to honor those who gave their all.

From VA.gov:

Three years after the Civil War ended, on May 5, 1868, the head of an organization of Union veterans — the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) — established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. It is believed that date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.

The first large observance was held that year at Arlington National Cemetery, across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C.

The ceremonies centered around the mourning-draped veranda of the Arlington mansion, once the home of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Various Washington officials, including Gen. and Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant, presided over the ceremonies. After speeches, children from the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Orphan Home and members of the GAR made their way through the cemetery, strewing flowers on both Union and Confederate graves, reciting prayers and singing hymns.

Local Observances Claim To Be First Local springtime tributes to the Civil War dead already had been held in various places. One of the first occurred in Columbus, Miss., April 25, 1866, when a group of women visited a cemetery to decorate the graves of Confederate soldiers who had fallen in battle at Shiloh. Nearby were the graves of Union soldiers, neglected because they were the enemy. Disturbed at the sight of the bare graves, the women placed some of their flowers on those graves, as well.

Today, cities in the North and the South claim to be the birthplace of Memorial Day in 1866. Both Macon and Columbus, Ga., claim the title, as well as Richmond, Va. The village of Boalsburg, Pa., claims it began there two years earlier. A stone in a Carbondale, Ill., cemetery carries the statement that the first Decoration Day ceremony took place there on April 29, 1866. Carbondale was the wartime home of Gen. Logan. Approximately 25 places have been named in connection with the origin of Memorial Day, many of them in the South where most of the war dead were buried.

Official Birthplace Declared In 1966, Congress and President Lyndon Johnson declared Waterloo, N.Y., the “birthplace” of Memorial Day. There, a ceremony on May 5, 1866, honored local veterans who had fought in the Civil War. Businesses closed and residents flew flags at half-staff. Supporters of Waterloo’s claim say earlier observances in other places were either informal, not community-wide or one-time events.

By the end of the 19th century, Memorial Day ceremonies were being held on May 30 throughout the nation. State legislatures passed proclamations designating the day, and the Army and Navy adopted regulations for proper observance at their facilities.

It was not until after World War I, however, that the day was expanded to honor those who have died in all American wars. In 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday by an act of Congress, though it is still often called Decoration Day. It was then also placed on the last Monday in May, as were some other federal holidays.

Some States Have Confederate Observances Many Southern states also have their own days for honoring the Confederate dead. Mississippi celebrates Confederate Memorial Day on the last Monday of April, Alabama on the fourth Monday of April, and Georgia on April 26. North and South Carolina observe it on May 10, Louisiana on June 3 and Tennessee calls that date Confederate Decoration Day. Texas celebrates Confederate Heroes Day January 19 and Virginia calls the last Monday in May Confederate Memorial Day.

[…]

To ensure the sacrifices of America ’s fallen heroes are never forgotten, in December 2000, the U.S. Congress passed and the president signed into law “The National Moment of Remembrance Act,” P.L. 106-579, creating the White House Commission on the National Moment of Remembrance. The commission’s charter is to “encourage the people of the United States to give something back to their country, which provides them so much freedom and opportunity” by encouraging and coordinating commemorations in the United States of Memorial Day and the National Moment of Remembrance.

The National Moment of Remembrance encourages all Americans to pause wherever they are at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day for a minute of silence to remember and honor those who have died in service to the nation. As Moment of Remembrance founder Carmella LaSpada states: “It’s a way we can all help put the memorial back in Memorial Day.”

From ABMC.gov:

Established by Congress in 1923, the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) commemorates the service, achievements, and sacrifice of U.S. armed forces. ABMC manages 24 overseas military cemeteries, and 25 memorials, monuments, and markers. Nearly all the cemeteries and memorials specifically honor those who served in World War I or World War II.

The sacrifice of more than 218,000 U.S. servicemen and women is memorialized at these locations. Nearly 125,000 American war dead are buried at ABMC cemeteries, with an additional 94,000 individuals commemorated on Tablets of the Missing.

So on Memorial Day each year, we remember the men and women who died and were buried on American soil as well as on the battlefields of World War II, the Korean War, and the Mexican War.  Most of our soldiers from Vietnam, Afghanistan, and Iraq have been brought home to be buried.

We owe a great debt to our fallen heroes for defending our homeland and fighting for our liberties.  May we never forget the sacrifices they have made for us.

See also:

Decoration Day

Civil War dead honored on Decoration Day

Memorial Day

How Arlington National Cemetery Came to Be

Advertisements

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Palin: Memorial Day and Rolling Thunder

Posted by Jackie Siciliano on May 25, 2012

Always remembering our active military members and the veterans of our nation, Governor Sarah Palin posts a Memorial Day message to her Facebook page

Todd and I and our family would like to wish you all a happy Memorial Day weekend. We’d especially like to offer our best wishes to our friends in Rolling Thunder who will be taking part in their Ride for Freedom this weekend in D.C. as they do each year to honor our vets and specifically to bring awareness to POW/MIA issues. We were honored to join them last year.

We were both sad to learn that Preston “Jay” Fairlamb, Jr., one of the organizers of Rolling Thunder and someone who made us so welcome last year, tragically died in an accident last week.  Jay was a Vietnam vet, a retired New Jersey State Trooper, and a great American who will be dearly missed.  Please keep his wife, his children, grandchildren and his innumerable friends in your prayers.

On this Memorial Day weekend, may God bless our brave men and women in uniform.

– Sarah Palin

Rolling_thunder11

Todd and I with Jay last year at Rolling Thunder. Photo by Shealah Craighead

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

President Ronald Reagan’s 1984 Memorial Day Speech

Posted by Gary P Jackson on May 30, 2011

President Reagan’s Remarks at Memorial Day Ceremonies Honoring an Unknown Serviceman of the Vietnam Conflict on May 28, 1984.

By Gary P Jackson

Each Memorial Day we remember those who gave their lives in order to protect all we hold so precious. Throughout the history of the United States brave men and women have fought to maintain our God given Liberty and Freedom. Far too many have died in the service to our cause, as they have not only protected our nation, but helped to free people world wide who also sought Liberty and Freedom.

I am always in awe of every man and woman who serves. In the world we live in today, it’s inspiring to see these brave citizens who honor our nation with their sacrifices, so the rest of us can enjoy the life we do.

There are never enough words to express the gratitude we all owe these men and women, or the families of those who have sacrificed their lives for us all.

The above video of Ronald Reagan is particularly meaningful. He speaks about the soldiers of Vietnam, who served their nation honorably, but didn’t get the appreciation they deserved when they returned home. This is, and will always be one of our nation’s great injustices.

Though we can never bring those lives lost back, we can make sure we thank our members of the military at every opportunity. As a nation we are truly blessed to have such fine men and women among us.

May God bless all who serve and all who gave their last full measure of devotion.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Video: Sarah Palin Joins Rolling Thunder

Posted by Gary P Jackson on May 29, 2011

By Gary P Jackson

A bit of video from Fox News of Sarah Palin at the Rolling Thunder rally in Washington, D.C. honoring P.O.W.s and those still Missing In Action.

I still can’t figure out Fox’s headline. “Stolen thunder“? Really Fox? Really?

Sarah Palin was invited to ride in the event as are many high profile leaders annually.

It never ceases to amaze me how the media, when there is no controversy, will go out of their way to create one. Anyone who questions Sarah Palin’s motivation to honor the military is insane. She’s the mother of an Iraq war vet, as well as a former Commander-in-Chief of two military forces. She speaks at events nationwide in support of our military men and women.

Here’s a photo of Sarah in the crowd:

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , | 3 Comments »

Yes America, Sarah Palin Was Invited To Rolling Thunder

Posted by Gary P Jackson on May 28, 2011

By Gary P Jackson

On Friday we published an article talking about patriot riders of Rolling Thunder praising Sarah and Todd Palin’s acceptance to ride in their event Sunday to raise awareness of former P.O.W.s and those still missing in action.

Rolling Thunder is a wonderful organization full of real patriots, and Sarah Palin, the mother of an Iraq War veteran, as well as a former Commander-in-Chief of two military forces supports the military, and military charities regularly.

Sadly, Rolling Thunder’s “legislative director,” Ted Shpak, instead of checking with others, ran to the nearest MSNBC cameras and started trash talking.

Long story short, Shpak created a real mess. Even as we reported Nancy Regg had confirmed days ago that Sarah and Todd had been invited, the damage to the organization, and Sarah Palin’s reputation was being done.

Now it seems Rolling Thunder’s media director, Christine Colborne, has set the record straight. Yes, Sarah and Todd were invited to ride. Ed Morrissey at Hot Air was able contact Colborne and set the record straight:

After I read this story last night, I got in contact with Christine Colborne, who handles the media for Rolling Thunder. She explained that Shpak didn’t know that Palin had been indeed invited to ride at the event. The invitation came from a retired board member, Michael DiPaolo, who had connections in Alaska and got Palin to agree to attend.

Requests for high-profile personalities to attend the event are not new. Colborne mentioned that actor Robert Patrick (Terminator 2: Judgment Day) attended at least one of the Rolling Thunder events, as have other celebrities, usually just to ride with a lower profile. Most times, though, those requests don’t even get responses, let alone acceptances. That’s a shame, because the Rolling Thunder event highlights the issues surrounding American POWs and MIAs from the Vietnam War and later conflicts, as well as providing support to their families, who really need the emotional support they get from this group of volunteer veterans.

Colborne spoke with me on the phone in the middle of an all-night car ride to Washington DC, and explained that the last-minute RSVP didn’t get communicated through the echelons of Rolling Thunder. Everyone is either in transit or already in DC, and internal communication broke down as often happens before a major event. Shpak (and Colborne) were taken by surprise by Palin’s announcement. Shpak does have the authority to speak for the organization, Colborne says, but he had no idea that Palin was invited by DiPaolo, and Shpak worried that Palin’s arrival might be a “big distraction” from the issues on which Rolling Thunder wants people to focus. Obviously, Shpak — a Vietnam veteran himself — feels passionate about defending the organization, but went on NBC with faulty information. Shpak, Colborne, and almost everyone else at Rolling Thunder are volunteers, just ordinary people doing extraordinary work, and that means they get the occasional hiccup.

Read more here.

Ed is too kind. Having worked events that need coordination, and a bit of media savvy, one thing I learned the hard way is to never go shooting one’s mouth off before one has all the facts.

Now I may be wrong, maybe Shpak made a good faith effort to contact someone…. anyone …. to see if the Palin’s had been invited, and got no answer, or even a faulty answer. What I don’t get though is why Shpak went directly to the most far left “news” organization on the planet to spout off. What purpose did it serve? Having a high profile leader attending your event is not a “big distraction.” The reason people like Sarah Palin are invited to these events is to help spotlight them. BTW, these events are open to any and all, and no invitation is needed.

Now we have an entire issue surrounding an event that is all about honoring our nation’s heroes.

The members who ride with Rolling Thunder are incredible. They do great work. That’s why this entire event makes me sad.

I could go on and on about speculating if Shpak has a political agenda.I could speculate why Shpak went to MSNBC, a company whose CEO is in bed with the Obama regime, and runs hit pieces on Sarah Palin daily. I could also go on and on about the amount of positive attention having a world leader like Sarah Palin in attendance brings. What I really want to know though is who does Sarah Palin need to see to get her reputation back?

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »