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Posts Tagged ‘history’

Palin: “Mr. President, Tear Down These Barricades!”

Posted by Jackie Siciliano on October 3, 2013

Posted to Palin’s Facebook page overnight:

Respect our vets!

Vets_2013

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Palin Pays Tribute to “Iron Lady” Margaret Thatcher (Updated)

Posted by Jackie Siciliano on April 8, 2013

Sarah Palin has, on many occasions, let it be known that Margaret Thatcher was a leader that she looked up to.  In fact, as recently as last month, Palin invoked former Prime Minister Thatcher in her CPAC speech.

“If Mrs. Thatcher were with us here today, she would remind us, there’s a big difference between being pro-business and being pro-free market. On this there can be no mistaking where free market stands. It’s time for We the People to break up the cronyism and put a stake through the heart of too big to fail once and for all.”

At time of writing, Palin has posted three tributes to former Prime Minister Thatcher on her Facebook page.

First post:

We’re deeply saddened at the loss of Margaret Thatcher. While the Iron Lady is sadly gone, her iron will, her unfailing trust in what is right and just, and her lessons to all of us will live on forever. She was a trailblazer like no other. We lost an icon, but her legacy, as solid as iron, will live on in perpetuity.

– Sarah Palin

Second Post:

In this post Governor Palin reiterated the same message as above and included this photo:

Thatcher

Third Post:

Sarah Palin penned an additional tribute to Margaret Thatcher which was published at National Review Online:

“The Grocer’s Daughter:

Margaret Thatcher not only broke a glass ceiling; she broke a class ceiling.”

Thatcher_GrocersDaughter

Today we say goodbye to a towering figure of the 20th century. With the passing of Margaret Thatcher, we’ve sadly lost the last living member of that great triumvirate that included Ronald Reagan and John Paul II — those giants who defeated the evil empire of Soviet Communism and allowed the liberation of its captive nations. We’ve also lost one of the great champions of economic freedom and democratic ideals.

Many will focus on the fact that Margaret Thatcher’s career was a collection of “firsts” for women — she was the first and youngest female Conservative-party member to stand for election, the first woman to hold the title Leader of the Opposition, and the first woman prime minister of the United Kingdom.

But Thatcher not only broke a glass ceiling; she broke a class ceiling. She was a grocer’s daughter from the back of beyond who advanced to the height of power in a class-conscious society. Like her friend Ronald Reagan, she was an underestimated underdog and political outsider. Simon Jenkins, the former editor of the Evening Standard, once said, “There was no Thatcher group within the Tory Party. . . . She was utterly and completely on her own. She simply was an outsider in every way.”  More

Update:

Yesterday, Governor Palin added a 4th tribute to Margaret Thatcher on her Facebook page.  This video, “Not For Turning”, was released by ShePAC on April 8th. 

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Palin: May We Never Forget

Posted by Jackie Siciliano on April 8, 2013

Sarah Palin takes time to remind us of Holocaust Remembrance Day.  From Palin’s Facebook page:

May we never forget.

Palin then linked to this story from the Jerusalem Post:

Israel prepares for Holocaust Remembrance Day

Holocaust_rem_day

Preparations are underway across the country for the observance of Holocaust Remembrance Day, which begins on Sunday evening.

The central theme of this year’s ceremony is defiance and rebellion during the Holocaust, Yad Vashem announced, marking 70 years since the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising.

Memorial activities will begin with a state ceremony at Yad Vashem’s Warsaw Ghetto Square at 8 p.m., during which President Shimon Peres and Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu will deliver addresses. Canadian Foreign Minister John Baird will also be in attendance.

Yad Vashem chairman Avner Shalev will light a memorial torch, followed by Holocaust survivors Otto Pressburger, Eliezer Eizenschmidt, Miriam Liptcher and Baruch Kopold who will light torches. Sima Hochman will light the first torch in place of her husband, Peretz, who passed away last week. More.

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Palin: Happy President’s Day

Posted by Jackie Siciliano on February 19, 2013

Pledge_sarah_piper

In honor of President’s Day, Sarah Palin posted two messages to her Facebook page to remind us of the importance of those past presidents who laid the foundation of this great country.

 

Message #1:

In honor of Presidents’ Day… saying the “Pledge of Allegiance” next to the brick tombs of President and Mrs. Washington on the Mount Vernon estate.

Message #2:

Celebrate Presidents Serving With Pure Motives

We’re kind of consumed with rugged race competition today in our house, but the important thing to remember this morning is the significance of February 18. It should be considered an honor to celebrate Presidents’ Day, particularly with the understanding that President George Washington is at the heart of this patriotic observance. With every passing day, as we recognize the true state of our union, we can appreciate even more those, like President Washington, who have served with pure motives and a true sense of purpose, who loved this nation more than self and truly sacrificed for her future.

Take a minute today to reflect on those who came before us and laid the foundation that was to be the solid rock on which future generations were built, then be inspired to fight for the restoration of all that made America a shining light in the world! Our past demands it, our present desperately requires it, and the world’s future depends on it.

Presidents’ Day reminds us that we have been uniquely blessed by God. Be grateful for the rights He has given us, and please honor those who have given themselves for the preservation of those rights. Let us reject any attempt to fundamentally transform our nation because we want our children and their children to know the American exceptionalism we have enjoyed and to deem it worthy of protecting. Freedom isn’t free, be willing to fight for it.

Happy Presidents’ Day.

– Sarah Palin

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Remembering Those Who Fought and Died in Our Place

Posted by Sarah Palin Web Brigade on May 28, 2012

Photo retrieved from ABMC.gov

Originally known as Decoration Day,  May 30  was established as a day to remember those who died in the American Civil War.  After World War I, Memorial Day came to be the day  we remember the American dead of all the wars our country has been  involved in.  In 1971, Congress  established Memorial Day as a national holiday and changed its observance to the last Monday in May,  resulting in a three-day holiday weekend.

Here are excerpts from  sites with information about the history of Memorial Day.

From USMemorialDay.org:

Memorial Day, originally called Decoration Day, is a day of remembrance for those who have died in our nation’s service. There are many stories as to its actual beginnings, with over two dozen cities and towns laying claim to being the birthplace of Memorial Day. There is also evidence that organized women’s groups in the South were decorating graves before the end of the Civil War: a hymn published in 1867, “Kneel Where Our Loves are Sleeping” by Nella L. Sweet carried the dedication “To The Ladies of the South who are Decorating the Graves of the Confederate Dead” (Source: Duke University’s Historic American Sheet Music, 1850-1920). While Waterloo N.Y. was officially declared the birthplace of Memorial Day by President Lyndon Johnson in May 1966, it’s difficult to prove conclusively the origins of the day. It is more likely that it had many separate beginnings; each of those towns and every planned or spontaneous gathering of people to honor the war dead in the 1860’s tapped into the general human need to honor our dead, each contributed honorably to the growing movement that culminated in Gen Logan giving his official proclamation in 1868. It is not important who was the very first, what is important is that Memorial Day was established. Memorial Day is not about division. It is about reconciliation; it is about coming together to honor those who gave their all.

From VA.gov:

Three years after the Civil War ended, on May 5, 1868, the head of an organization of Union veterans — the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) — established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. It is believed that date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.

The first large observance was held that year at Arlington National Cemetery, across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C.

The ceremonies centered around the mourning-draped veranda of the Arlington mansion, once the home of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Various Washington officials, including Gen. and Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant, presided over the ceremonies. After speeches, children from the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Orphan Home and members of the GAR made their way through the cemetery, strewing flowers on both Union and Confederate graves, reciting prayers and singing hymns.

Local Observances Claim To Be First Local springtime tributes to the Civil War dead already had been held in various places. One of the first occurred in Columbus, Miss., April 25, 1866, when a group of women visited a cemetery to decorate the graves of Confederate soldiers who had fallen in battle at Shiloh. Nearby were the graves of Union soldiers, neglected because they were the enemy. Disturbed at the sight of the bare graves, the women placed some of their flowers on those graves, as well.

Today, cities in the North and the South claim to be the birthplace of Memorial Day in 1866. Both Macon and Columbus, Ga., claim the title, as well as Richmond, Va. The village of Boalsburg, Pa., claims it began there two years earlier. A stone in a Carbondale, Ill., cemetery carries the statement that the first Decoration Day ceremony took place there on April 29, 1866. Carbondale was the wartime home of Gen. Logan. Approximately 25 places have been named in connection with the origin of Memorial Day, many of them in the South where most of the war dead were buried.

Official Birthplace Declared In 1966, Congress and President Lyndon Johnson declared Waterloo, N.Y., the “birthplace” of Memorial Day. There, a ceremony on May 5, 1866, honored local veterans who had fought in the Civil War. Businesses closed and residents flew flags at half-staff. Supporters of Waterloo’s claim say earlier observances in other places were either informal, not community-wide or one-time events.

By the end of the 19th century, Memorial Day ceremonies were being held on May 30 throughout the nation. State legislatures passed proclamations designating the day, and the Army and Navy adopted regulations for proper observance at their facilities.

It was not until after World War I, however, that the day was expanded to honor those who have died in all American wars. In 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday by an act of Congress, though it is still often called Decoration Day. It was then also placed on the last Monday in May, as were some other federal holidays.

Some States Have Confederate Observances Many Southern states also have their own days for honoring the Confederate dead. Mississippi celebrates Confederate Memorial Day on the last Monday of April, Alabama on the fourth Monday of April, and Georgia on April 26. North and South Carolina observe it on May 10, Louisiana on June 3 and Tennessee calls that date Confederate Decoration Day. Texas celebrates Confederate Heroes Day January 19 and Virginia calls the last Monday in May Confederate Memorial Day.

[…]

To ensure the sacrifices of America ’s fallen heroes are never forgotten, in December 2000, the U.S. Congress passed and the president signed into law “The National Moment of Remembrance Act,” P.L. 106-579, creating the White House Commission on the National Moment of Remembrance. The commission’s charter is to “encourage the people of the United States to give something back to their country, which provides them so much freedom and opportunity” by encouraging and coordinating commemorations in the United States of Memorial Day and the National Moment of Remembrance.

The National Moment of Remembrance encourages all Americans to pause wherever they are at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day for a minute of silence to remember and honor those who have died in service to the nation. As Moment of Remembrance founder Carmella LaSpada states: “It’s a way we can all help put the memorial back in Memorial Day.”

From ABMC.gov:

Established by Congress in 1923, the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) commemorates the service, achievements, and sacrifice of U.S. armed forces. ABMC manages 24 overseas military cemeteries, and 25 memorials, monuments, and markers. Nearly all the cemeteries and memorials specifically honor those who served in World War I or World War II.

The sacrifice of more than 218,000 U.S. servicemen and women is memorialized at these locations. Nearly 125,000 American war dead are buried at ABMC cemeteries, with an additional 94,000 individuals commemorated on Tablets of the Missing.

So on Memorial Day each year, we remember the men and women who died and were buried on American soil as well as on the battlefields of World War II, the Korean War, and the Mexican War.  Most of our soldiers from Vietnam, Afghanistan, and Iraq have been brought home to be buried.

We owe a great debt to our fallen heroes for defending our homeland and fighting for our liberties.  May we never forget the sacrifices they have made for us.

See also:

Decoration Day

Civil War dead honored on Decoration Day

Memorial Day

How Arlington National Cemetery Came to Be

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