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Archive for November, 2013

Picture of the Day (Maybe the Year)

Posted by Jackie Siciliano on November 29, 2013

Truth+telling

Enough said!

I saw this on Twitter today and if the creator will tweet me  (@jackiesic), I’ll give proper credit.

h/t  SE Smith

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Happy Thanksgiving and Chag Chanukah Sameach!

Posted by Dr. Fay on November 28, 2013

Video retrieved from jjobrasil.

2013 is one of the few times that the Thanksgiving holiday has coincided with Hanukkah, which began at sunset last evening.  So Jewish Americans will be lighting the second candle on the Menorah tonight as they celebrate Thanksgiving as well.

Rabbi Tzvi Freeman writes at Chabad.org:

Chanukah was declared a Jewish national holiday 2178 years ago. Thanksgiving was declared a national American holiday on the last Thursday of every November by Abraham Lincoln in 1863. Before then, Thanksgiving was celebrated on different dates in different states, so we won’t count those [for comparison purposes]. But, using the Chabad.org Date Converter, you will see that Thanksgiving coincided with the first day of Chanukah on November 29, 1888. It also coincided with the fourth day of Chanukah on November 30, 1899.

On November 28, 1918, Thanksgiving was on Chanukah eve. But since it’s still Thanksgiving until midnight, and Jewish days begin at night, that would still mean that Jewish Americans would have eaten their turkeys that Thanksgiving to the light of their first Chanukah candle.

It gets more complicated. Originally, Thanksgiving was always on the last Thursday of November. In 1939, FDR decided it would be good for the economy to push Thanksgiving back a little, so he declared the fourth Thursday of that November to be Thanksgiving—even though there were five Thursdays to November that year. In 1942, that became federal law. But not all states went along with it. As late as 1956, Texas was still celebrating Thanksgiving a week later than the rest of the country.

Which means that if you were a Texan Jewish family, you would be eating that turkey to the light of your first Chanukah light in 1945 and 1956.

Will it ever happen again? Interesting question. If we project forward, assuming that:

  1. Thanksgiving will be celebrated on the same schedule,
  2. The people celebrating Thanksgiving will continue following the Gregorian calendar without modification,
  3. The Jewish calendar will continue on its current 19-year cycle,

. . . then the next time the two will coincide would be when Thanksgiving falls on Chanukah eve in the year 2070. That would repeat itself in 2165.

The spiritual significance of Hanukkah is discussed here:

The joyous festival of Hanukkah begins on 25 Kislev of the Jewish calendar. It celebrates two miracles –a great Jewish military victory and a miraculous supply of oil for the Temple.

Hanukkah marks the Macabees’ long-ago defeat of the much-larger Greek-Syrian army that had invaded Israel. The Macabees were just a small group of Jews led by Mattathias and his five sons, including Judah Macabee. But they organized themselves into a guerrilla army and, with God’s help, proved stronger than their powerful enemy.

Following the Macabees’ victory, the Jews rededicated the Holy Temple in Jerusalem and, once again, were able to worship freely.

Although Hanukkah celebrates a military victory, its major symbol — the Hanukkah menorah, or hanukkiah — reminds us of the miracle of the oil. As the Jews purified the Holy Temple, they found only one flask of the oil for the eternal lamp — enough to keep it burning for just one day. But a miracle occurred, and the oil lasted eight days and nights until more oil could be brought from afar. That miracle explains why we celebrate Hanukkah for eight days and also why Hanukkah is called the Festival of Lights.

The Hanukkah menorah holds nine candles, one for each of the eight nights and an additional candle that’s used to light the others. One candle is lit on the first night of Hanukkah, two on the second night, until all eight candles are lit on the eighth night.

We at SPIB want to wish our Jewish friends and readers a happy and blessed double holiday today of Thanksgiving and Hanukkah.

Happy Thanksgiving, and Chaq Chanukah Sameach!

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Why We Celebrate Thanksgiving

Posted by Dr. Fay on November 28, 2013

Our national day of Thanksgiving dates back to the celebration of a bountiful harvest following the first harsh winter in the Plymouth colony.  That day of thanksgiving, however, may have followed a tradition of giving thanks to God that dates as far back as the first celebration of Sukot, or the Feast of Tabernacles.

Here are some excerpts from an excellent history of Thanksgiving Day posted at WallBuilders

Celebrating Thanksgiving in America

The tradition introduced by European Americans of Thanksgiving as a time to focus on God and His blessings dates back well over four centuries in America. For example, such thanksgivings occurred in 1541 at Palo Duro Canyon, Texas with Coronado and 1,500 of his men; 1 in 1564 at St. Augustine, Florida with French Huguenot (Protestant) colonists; 2 in 1598 at El Paso, Texas with Juan de Oñate and his expedition; 3 in 1607 at Cape Henry, Virginia with the landing of the Jamestown settlers; 4 in 1619 at Berkeley Plantation, Virginia; 5 (and many other such celebrations). But it is primarily from the Pilgrim’s Thanksgiving celebration of 1621 that we derive the current tradition of Thanksgiving Day.

The Pilgrims set sail for America on September 6, 1620, and for two months braved the harsh elements of a storm-tossed sea. Upon disembarking at Plymouth Rock, they held a prayer service and then hastily began building shelters; however, unprepared for such a harsh New England winter, nearly half of them died before spring. 6 Emerging from that grueling winter, the Pilgrims were surprised when an Indian named Samoset approached them and greeted them in their own language, explaining to them that he had learned English from fishermen and traders. A week later, Samoset returned with a friend named Squanto, who lived with the Pilgrims and accepted their Christian faith. Squanto taught the Pilgrims much about how to live in the New World, and he and Samoset helped forge a long-lasting peace treaty between the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag Indians. Pilgrim Governor William Bradford described Squanto as “a special instrument sent of God for [our] good . . . and never left [us] till he died.” 7

That summer, the Pilgrims, still persevering in prayer and assisted by helpful Indians, 8 reaped a bountiful harvest. 9 As Pilgrim Edward Winslow (later to become the Governor) affirmed, “God be praised, we had a good increase of Indian corn”; “by the goodness of God, we are…far from want.” 10 The grateful Pilgrims therefore declared a three-day feast in December 1621 to thank God and to celebrate with their Indian friends 11 – America’s first Thanksgiving Festival. Ninety Wampanoag Indians joined the fifty Pilgrims for three days of feasting (which included shellfish, lobsters, turkey, corn bread, berries, deer, and other foods), of play (the young Pilgrim and Wampanoag men engaged in races, wrestling matches, and athletic events), and of prayer. This celebration and its accompanying activities were the origin of the holiday that Americans now celebrate each November.

[…]

America’s first national Thanksgiving occurred in 1789 with the commencement of the federal government. According to the Congressional Record for September 25 of that year, the first act after the Framers completed the framing of the Bill of Rights was that:

Mr. [Elias] Boudinot said he could not think of letting the session pass without offering an opportunity to all the citizens of the United States of joining with one voice in returning to Almighty God their sincere thanks for the many blessings He had poured down upon them. With this view, therefore, he would move the following resolution:

Resolved, That a joint committee of both Houses be directed to wait upon the President of the United States to request that he would recommend to the people of the United States a Day of Public Thanksgiving and Prayer. . . .

Mr. Roger Sherman justified the practice of thanksgiving on any single event not only as a laudable one in itself but also as warranted by a number of precedents in Holy Writ. . . . This example he thought worthy of a Christian imitation on the present occasion. 15

That congressional resolution was delivered to President George Washington, who heartily concurred with the request and issued the first federal Thanksgiving proclamation, declaring in part:

Whereas it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey His will, to be grateful for His benefits, and humbly to implore His protection and favor. . . . Now, therefore, I do recommend and assign Thursday, the 26th day of November [1789] . . . that we may all unite to render unto Him our sincere and humble thanks for His kind care and protection. 16

Much of the credit for the adoption of Thanksgiving as an annual national holiday may be attributed to Mrs. Sarah Josepha Hale, the editor of Godey’s Lady’s Book, a popular lady’s books containing poetry, art work, and articles by America’s leading authors. For two decades, she promoted the idea of a national Thanksgiving Day, 20 contacting president after president until Abraham Lincoln responded in 1863 by setting aside the last Thursday of that November.

[…]

That remarkable Thanksgiving Proclamation came at a pivotal point in Lincoln’s spiritual life. Three months earlier, the Battle of Gettysburg had occurred, resulting in the loss of some 60,000 American lives. It had been while Lincoln was walking among the thousands of graves there at Gettysburg that he first committed his life to Christ.

[…]

Over the seventy-five years following Lincoln’s Thanksgiving Proclamation, presidents faithfully followed Lincoln’s precedent, annually declaring a national Thanksgiving Day (but the date of the celebrations varied widely from proclamation to proclamation). In 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt began celebrating Thanksgiving on the fourth Thursday of each November, and in 1941, Congress permanently established that day as the national Thanksgiving holiday. 23

As you celebrate Thanksgiving this year, remember to retain the original gratefulness to God that has always been the spirit of this – the oldest of all American holidays.

Read more.

Lest we forget, our founding fathers and early settlers, while believing deeply in freedom of religion, also had a strong faith in God’s intervention in our worldly affairs.  Today we witness a purging of Christianity from our schools, our public meetings, and our military.  Not so when this country was founded in 1776:

The Continental-Confederation Congress, a legislative body that governed the United States from 1774 to 1789, contained an extraordinary number of deeply religious men. The amount of energy that Congress invested in encouraging the practice of religion in the new nation exceeded that expended by any subsequent American national government. Although the Articles of Confederation did not officially authorize Congress to concern itself with religion, the citizenry did not object to such activities. This lack of objection suggests that both the legislators and the public considered it appropriate for the national government to promote a nondenominational, nonpolemical Christianity.

Congress appointed chaplains for itself and the armed forces, sponsored the publication of a Bible, imposed Christian morality on the armed forces, and granted public lands to promote Christianity among the Indians. National days of thanksgiving and of “humiliation, fasting, and prayer” were proclaimed by Congress at least twice a year throughout the war. Congress was guided by “covenant theology,” a Reformation doctrine especially dear to New England Puritans, which held that God bound himself in an agreement with a nation and its people. This agreement stipulated that they “should be prosperous or afflicted, according as their general Obedience or Disobedience thereto appears.” Wars and revolutions were, accordingly, considered afflictions, as divine punishments for sin, from which a nation could rescue itself by repentance and reformation.

The first national government of the United States, was convinced that the “public prosperity” of a society depended on the vitality of its religion. Nothing less than a “spirit of universal reformation among all ranks and degrees of our citizens,” Congress declared to the American people, would “make us a holy, that so we may be a happy people.”

Read more.

May we remember to thank God for His many blessings as we enjoy Thanksgiving dinner and time with family today.  And may God’s blessings continue to be on us and upon America, the country He birthed in liberty.

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone!

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Palin: Join Me in a Moment of Prayer to Give Thanks

Posted by Jackie Siciliano on November 26, 2013

A special Thanksgiving message from Sarah Palin:

Emailheader

Friends,

Thanksgiving offers us invaluable time to spend with our family and reflect on our many blessings. In 1789, George Washington declared a day of national Thanksgiving for our new country to render unto God our “sincere and humble thanks for His kind care and protection.”

But even before that first proclamation from a new nation, pioneers across America celebrated Thanksgiving as a time to give praise to God for full harvests and Divine Providence.

And indeed, America has been richly blessed. From coast to coast, we enjoy an abundance of natural resources, plentiful harvests, beautiful cities and our most precious gift of all—a people who value liberty and continue to stand as an example to the world of all that can be accomplished by a free and hard-working people.

SarahPAC-EmailBroadcast-2013

This Thanksgiving, join me in a moment of prayer to give thanks for the thousands of American men and women in our armed forces who will spend Thanksgiving away from their homes and families, facing danger overseas to protect our way of life.

When we sit down to enjoy a family meal on Thursday, I will give thanks to God for the blessing of a strong and diverse family life that has taught me so much about loyalty, selflessness, and compassion. I will pray for God’s continued blessings on my family, and on yours, and on this great nation of ours.

From my family to yours, God bless you and Happy Thanksgiving!

With an Alaskan heart,

Sarah Palin

P.S. Be sure to check out the latest video from my book tour by clicking here!

    Paid for by SarahPAC
Not authorized by any candidate or candidate’s committee
www.SarahPAC.com
P.O. Box 7711
Arlington, VA 22207

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Gov. Palin Set to Speak at Baldwin County Republican Dinner

Posted by Jackie Siciliano on November 26, 2013

Book_image

From the Baldwin County Republican website:

The Baldwin County Republican Party Presents

An Evening with Sarah Palin 

Friday, April 25, 2014

The Orange Beach Event Center at the Whart

4671 Wharf Parkway, Orange Beach, AL

(at the intersections of Canal Road and The Foley Beach Express)

6:00 PM      Photo Opportunity with Sarah Palin (Gold and Silver Sponsors) 

7:00 PM      Dinner and Keynote Presentation         

8:45 PM     Book Signing and Sarah Palin Press Conference (Gold Sponsors)  

Ticket Prices:

Individual Ticket – $125:     One ticket for dinner and keynote presentation, open seating

Reserved Table for 10 – $1,500:  Includes a “Reserved Table” sign 

Silver Sponsorship for 10 – $2,500:  Includes photo opportunity with Sarah Palin, recognition in the program and slide presentation, reserved table for 10 for dinner and keynote presentation.

Gold Sponsorship for 10 – $3,000:   (Sold Out)  Includes 10 copies of Sarah Palin’s latest book, Good Tidings and Great Joy: Protecting the Heart of Christmas (Nov. 2013 release), book signing and access to Sarah Palin press conference, recognition in the program and an individual slide in the slide presentation, reserved table for 10 for dinner and keynote presentation, premium location.

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Palin: “Celebrating The Season” in Ft. Campbell (video)

Posted by Jackie Siciliano on November 25, 2013

SarahPAC has just released a lovely video highlighting Gov. Palin’s “Good Tidings and Great Joy” book tour stop in Ft. Campbell, Kentucky on November 15th.  I’ve said enough. Please watch the video and let it speak to your  heart.

 


h/t SarahPalinAK

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Billy Graham Library to Host Gov. Palin for Book Signing

Posted by Jackie Siciliano on November 24, 2013

Grahamlibrary1_13_12-06The Billy Graham Library has announced that Gov. Sarah Palin will bring her “Good Tidings and Great Joy; Protecting the Heart of Christmas” book tour their Charlotte, NC location on December 6th.  The following is the press release from The Billy Graham Library:

 

Former governor of Alaska, Sarah Palin, will be at the Billy Graham Library to sign copies of her new holiday book, Good Tidings and Great Joy: Protecting the Heart of Christmas from 10 a.m. to noon on Friday, Dec. 6. Her book revisits our traditional roots and the true meaning of Christmas. It is a call to action to readers to defend and openly celebrate the joys of their Christianity, and to say to one another, “Merry Christmas!”

In Good Tidings and Great Joy, Palin calls for bringing back the freedom to express the Christian values of the season. She asserts the importance of preserving Jesus Christ in Christmas—in public displays, school concerts, pageants and our expressions to one another—and laments the over-commercialization and homogenization of Christmas in today’s society.

To reserve a signed book, come to Ruth’s Attic Bookstore at the Billy Graham Library. Upon purchasing a reserved book, you will receive a receipt and wristband while supplies last. You must bring the receipt and wristband to the book signing to gain access to the event and receive your book. No outside books will be allowed. No exceptions. No refunds. Limit 4 (four) signed books per person.

For more information, call 704-401-3200.

Good_tidings_cover

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Palin: Day 8 of “Good Tidings and Great Joy” Book Tour 11/20/13

Posted by Jackie Siciliano on November 24, 2013

First stop on November 20th for the “Good Tidings and Great Joy” book tour was Sam’s Club of Tyler, TX.  Gov. Palin posted a Facebook message of thanks to those that attended:

Tyler1_13_1120

Photo by Shealah Craighead

Thank you, thank you, Tyler, Texas! Great to be back to see many whom I’d met at the Oil Palace after my pro-American Energy speech. Really great to meet new friends today, too! Your gracious Southern welcome warms us right up. Special thanks to everyone who joined us today and provided fun, laughter, and new energy in the book line. And what a super staff at Sam’s Club! Now on to that other energy-producing sister state America loves – Oklahoma! (Alaskans of a certain age will remember an infamous bumper sticker about Texans and Okies which was popular when finishing construction of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline in the 70’s… but I promise it was never on my truck! “Happiness is a Texan flying south with an Okie under each arm.” Just in jest and we love you guys! Er, y’all.)

The following was published by KLTV9:

TYLER, TX (KLTV) –

Hundreds of East Texans lined up for hours Wednesday morning for their shot at meeting former Vice Presidential candidate Sarah Palin. Palin was in Tyler Wednesday, a pit stop that is part of her nationwide tour promoting her new book.

Many people in line drove or even flew in for a chance to meet the former Alaskan governor.

One of those men was Michael Jenkins, who was first in line for the book-signing frenzy. Jenkins arrived just after 11 p.m. on Tuesday.

“This is my third time to see her,” Jenkins said. “The first time we made it over 20 hours before and we were not even close to the front of the line and I just wanted to make sure I got a spot in line.”

That meant braving low overnight temperatures in the 40s.

“I stayed in my car,” Jenkins said. “I had a blanket wrapped up right here, and then the rest of the time I was in my car. It was too cold.”

Marilyn Mcneely hit the road from Jefferson at 3 a.m. Wednesday morning.

“I expected a long line this morning,” Mcneely said. “I almost jumped for joy when I saw I was number six.”

Number six in a line filled with hundreds, all waiting for a few brief seconds with the former governor. But it was all worth it for people like Shirley Greene, who is actually from Idaho.

“I had a trip planned to visit a friend in the Dallas area,” Green said. “So I rented a car and got up early this morning and drove down.”

Greene thinks of Palin as somewhat of a family friend.  Video & more

From Texas it was on to Edmond, OK where an evening signing was scheduled at the Mardel Christian & Education Supply.  Gov. Palin posted the following via Facebook:

O! K! Last night in Oklahoma, Kathy Young (see photo) shared her “The Best Peanut Butter Carb Bar EVER” recipe with me – sounded so good we almost ate the Christmas card it was written on! Thanks, Kathy, and congratulations on celebrating your Golden Wedding anniversary during the Christmas holiday at the same church in Edmond where you were married. As promised, I’ll make the Carb Bars when I get home. Friends, enjoy the tradition of sharing recipes as I did in “Good Tidings and Great Joy.” Or begin the tradition at our book events!

Thank you, Oklahoma, for supporting the “Good Tidings and Great Joy” message last night. So many inspiring people are committed to protect the heart of Christmas – and your efforts mean a world of difference in today’s culture. Lots of conscientious parents and grandparents brought youngsters on a school night to share early Christmas cheer, testifying powerfully to sincere support. It was a joy to see so many happy faces sharing your Okie hospitality. Kudos to the thoughtful staff at Mardel; thanks for putting up with our healthy “energetic” chaos that inevitably accompanies big events! Now on to Arkansas and Kansas for ramped up empowering of good Americans so we can stand united for joyous tradition, faith, family and freedom.

UPDATE: Some of you have asked for that Peanut Butter Carb Bar Recipe that Kathy Young gave me last night. Here’s Kathy’s recipe:

The Best Carb Bar Recipe EVER by Kathy Young of Edmond, OK

1 c. Honey
1 c. Brown Sugar
1 c. Peanut Butter with nuts
4 c. Cereal – any kind (I love Honey Bunches of Oats with Almonds)
Additional ingredients:
Raisins, Chocolate Chips

1) Microwave Honey, Brown Sugar, and Peanut Butter on high 3 minutes in large bowl stirring every minute

2) Add Cereal to warm mixture

3) May add Raisins and Chocolate Chips to warm mixture (Chocolate Chips will melt)

4) Spread mixture into 13×9 inch pan sprayed with cooking spray

5) Cool, slice (approx. 30 squares) and enjoy!

Edmond1_131120

Photo by Shealah Craighead

 

Gov. Palin also shared a photo album consisting of twelve wonderful photos from the Edmond event.  Once again, I’ll point out that it’s quite obvious that Gov. Palin really enjoys meeting her supporters.

KFOR TV published the following on Palin’s book signing event:

EDMOND, Okla. – Former Vice Presidential candidate Sarah Palin made an appearance in the Sooner State.She’s hosted a signing event in Edmond for her new holiday book.

Her new novel is titled “Good Tidings and Great Joy: Protecting the Heart of Christmas.”

The signing was at 4 p.m. Wednesday at Mardel near 33rd St. and Boulevard.

The first 750 customers were guaranteed a spot in line but only if they had a wristband. Video here.

The schedule for first leg of the book tour can be found here and I’m looking forward to the announcement  of the second leg stops.

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Palin: Day 7 of “Good Tidings and Great Joy” Book Tour 11/19/13

Posted by Jackie Siciliano on November 24, 2013

Day 7 of the “Good Tidings and Great Joy; Protecting the Heart of Christmas” book tour took Gov. Sarah Palin to the Costco in Plano, TX.  According to a Facebook post in which Gov. Palin honored the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address, she offered a thank you to the people of Plano for their understanding that the book signing event to cut short.

Gettysburg_plano

We’d especially like to thank the gracious people of Plano, Texas, who came out today and were so understanding about today’s abbreviated event. Also, thank you to the helpful and kind employees at Costco.

The following photo gallery from the Plano event was uploaded by user “jester119”

While in the area, Rafael Cruz, father of Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) held a fundraiser for Palin’s SarahPAC.  Gov. Palin, via her Facebook page, offered the following message of thanks to Mr. Cruz:

A big Texas thanks to Rafael Cruz, Senator Ted Cruz’s father, for hosting us last night with other SarahPAC supporters. It’s inspiring to hear Rafael’s full-throated defense of American exceptionalism. As an American of Cuban descent, Rafael has witnessed first hand what it means to live without freedom, and that has made him an eloquent and motivated American patriot. God bless him and all the SarahPAC supporters we met yesterday. Together we’re working to restore our exceptional nation!

Cruz_fundraiser13_1119

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Gov. Palin: Obamacare itself – not the website – is the problem

Posted by Dr. Fay on November 24, 2013

Video retrieved from sarahnettoo.

Governor Palin talked with Chris Wallace on FOX News Sunday earlier today about the Obamacare rollout debacle, the Senate “nuclear option” rule change, and Martin Bashir’s comments and subsequent apology.

Governor Palin said the Obamacare website wasn’t the problem, that Obamacare itself was.  She said that the Senate rule change was a distraction, a double standard, more Democrat hypocrisy, and that it “stinks.”   Tony Lee at Breitbart has captured her response to the Bashir comments:

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin blasted the hypocrisy of the mainstream media elite for brushing off vile attacks against conservative women in an appearance on Fox News Sunday.

Host Chris Wallace asked Palin about MSNBC host Martin Bashir’s suggestion that someone should defecate and urinate in her mouth, and she said MSNBC “is condoning those types of statements because there has been no punishment of the fella who’s said those words.”

She said such hypocrisy is a “given when a conservative women” is attacked, and the media elite just “pooh-pooh it, laugh it off.”

Palin mentioned that even though Bashir got so offended that she compared the federal debt to slavery in its plain, non-racial meaning, Bashir has “invoked the analogy of slavery” as well, emphasizing that the definition of slavery is being “beholden to a master.” Wallace agreed that Palin’s comparison of the debt to slavery was “unobjectionable.”

As for personally taking shots like that, Palin said she had a choice of becoming “bitter” or “better.” She said she does not have to accept Bashir’s “vile” and “evil” remarks and can “move on” and “charge forth.”

Palin did warn those in the “media elite bubble” that they better not attack someone who is “defenseless like a vulnerable child.” Palin’s son Trig, who has Down Syndrome, has often been ridiculed by the mainstream media elite that she often denounces.

“Well, if you wanna see a mamma grizzly get riled up and slap that person down, then you come after a vulnerable child,” Palin said. “In this case, he didn’t come after a vulnerable child. I can defend myself. I can take it.”

In a letter that her political action committee, SarahPAC, wrote to MSNBC President Phil Griffin and NBC News President Deborah Turness, which Breitbart News exclusively obtained last week, SarahPAC Treasurer Tim Crawford pointed out MSNBC’s hypocrisy for not disciplining Bashir, even though Bashir made his comments on air while Alec Baldwin, whom the network suspended for two weeks, made the anti-gay comments for which he got punished off the air.

Read more.

Noel Sheppard at NewsBusters also has a transcript of her response to Bashir’s remarks here.

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