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Archive for April 8th, 2013

Palin Pays Tribute to “Iron Lady” Margaret Thatcher (Updated)

Posted by Jackie Siciliano on April 8, 2013

Sarah Palin has, on many occasions, let it be known that Margaret Thatcher was a leader that she looked up to.  In fact, as recently as last month, Palin invoked former Prime Minister Thatcher in her CPAC speech.

“If Mrs. Thatcher were with us here today, she would remind us, there’s a big difference between being pro-business and being pro-free market. On this there can be no mistaking where free market stands. It’s time for We the People to break up the cronyism and put a stake through the heart of too big to fail once and for all.”

At time of writing, Palin has posted three tributes to former Prime Minister Thatcher on her Facebook page.

First post:

We’re deeply saddened at the loss of Margaret Thatcher. While the Iron Lady is sadly gone, her iron will, her unfailing trust in what is right and just, and her lessons to all of us will live on forever. She was a trailblazer like no other. We lost an icon, but her legacy, as solid as iron, will live on in perpetuity.

– Sarah Palin

Second Post:

In this post Governor Palin reiterated the same message as above and included this photo:

Thatcher

Third Post:

Sarah Palin penned an additional tribute to Margaret Thatcher which was published at National Review Online:

“The Grocer’s Daughter:

Margaret Thatcher not only broke a glass ceiling; she broke a class ceiling.”

Thatcher_GrocersDaughter

Today we say goodbye to a towering figure of the 20th century. With the passing of Margaret Thatcher, we’ve sadly lost the last living member of that great triumvirate that included Ronald Reagan and John Paul II — those giants who defeated the evil empire of Soviet Communism and allowed the liberation of its captive nations. We’ve also lost one of the great champions of economic freedom and democratic ideals.

Many will focus on the fact that Margaret Thatcher’s career was a collection of “firsts” for women — she was the first and youngest female Conservative-party member to stand for election, the first woman to hold the title Leader of the Opposition, and the first woman prime minister of the United Kingdom.

But Thatcher not only broke a glass ceiling; she broke a class ceiling. She was a grocer’s daughter from the back of beyond who advanced to the height of power in a class-conscious society. Like her friend Ronald Reagan, she was an underestimated underdog and political outsider. Simon Jenkins, the former editor of the Evening Standard, once said, “There was no Thatcher group within the Tory Party. . . . She was utterly and completely on her own. She simply was an outsider in every way.”  More

Update:

Yesterday, Governor Palin added a 4th tribute to Margaret Thatcher on her Facebook page.  This video, “Not For Turning”, was released by ShePAC on April 8th. 

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Baroness Margaret Thatcher, friend of Israel, passes on Yom Hashoah

Posted by Dr. Fay on April 8, 2013

Baroness Margaret Thatcher, champion of Israel, died today on Holocaust Remembrance Day.  Adam Chandler at the Tablet notes that Baroness Thatcher’s proudest moment was when she helped a young woman escape the Holocaust.

Fortunately for us, history sometimes dovetails nicely and the remembrances of Thatcher–who held many honorifics as a long-serving prime minister and woman pioneer in British politics–can boast Thatcher’s sensitivity toward and fidelity to the important Jewish causes of her era. Leading this, I’d like to point back to Charles Johnson’s thorough exploration of Thatcher’s relationship with the Jews, written in late December of 2011.

Johnson starts with what Thatcher often said was her greatest accomplishment, which was not her work in helping to topple the Soviet Union or being the first British woman to hold the post of prime minister, but rather, was her work as a child to save a Jewish teenage in Austria from the grasp of Hitler’s terror.

In 1938, Edith Muhlbauer, a 17-year-old Jewish girl, wrote to Muriel Roberts, Edith’s pen pal and the future prime minister’s [Margaret Thatcher] older sister, asking if the Roberts family might help her escape Hitler’s Austria. The Nazis had begun rounding up the first of Vienna’s Jews after the Anschluss, and Edith and her family worried she might be next. Alfred Roberts, Margaret and Muriel’s father, was a small-town grocer; the family had neither the time nor the money to take Edith in. So Margaret, then 12, and Muriel, 17, set about raising funds and persuading the local Rotary club to help.

Edith stayed with more than a dozen Rotary families, including the Robertses, for the next two years, until she could move to join relatives in South America. Edith bunked in Margaret’s room, and she left an impression. “She was 17, tall, beautiful, evidently from a well-to-do family,” Thatcher later wrote in her memoir. But most important, “[s]he told us what it was like to live as a Jew under an anti-Semitic regime. One thing Edith reported particularly stuck in my mind: The Jews, she said, were being made to scrub the streets.” For Thatcher, who believed in meaningful work, this was as much a waste as it was an outrage. Had the Roberts family not intervened, Edith recalled years later, “I would have stayed in Vienna and they would have killed me.” Thatcher never forgot the lesson: “Never hesitate to do whatever you can, for you may save a life,” she told audiences in 1995 after Edith had been located, alive and well, in Brazil.

Throughout Thatcher’s life, this commitment never waned. Divisive as she was, her energetic work to supplant British support for the Arab boycott of Israel, her hectoring of Soviet Union officials about the treatment of Jewish refuseniks, her inclusion of Jewish leaders in her cabinet (to the frustration of some), and her landmark visit to Israel–the first by a sitting British prime minister–will likely keep her as a cherished figure in the collective Jewish memory for a long time to come.

Read more.

Here are additional excerpts from the “Thatcher and the Jews” article cited by Adam Chandler.

Other British politicians and their families housed Jews during the war, but none seems to have been profoundly affected by it as Thatcher was. Harold Macmillan, a Thatcher foe and England’s prime minister from 1957 to 1963, provided a home for Jewish refugees on his estate, but his relations with Jews were always frosty, the mark of a genuflecting anti-Semitism common among the Tory grandees.

[…]

Thatcher, by contrast, had no patience for anti-Semitism or for those who countenanced it. “I simply did not understand anti-semitism myself,” Thatcher confessed in her memoirs. Indeed, she found “some of [her] closest political friends and associates among Jews.” Unique among British politicians, she was unusually free of even “the faintest trace of anti-Semitism in her make-up,” wrote Nigel Lawson, her chancellor of the Exchequer, in 1992. Lawson knew of what he spoke. Alan Clark, a senior Tory politician, wrote in his diaries that some of the old guard, himself included, thought Lawson could not, “as a Jew,” be offered the position of foreign secretary. Lawson’s “Jewish parentage was disqualification enough,” the Sunday Telegraph wrote in 1988, without a hint of shame. Rumors and speculation persisted well into the 1990s about why this or that Jewish member of Parliament couldn’t be made leader of the Conservative Party.

[…]

Early on in her career—even before she entered politics—Thatcher had worked alongside Jews as a chemist at J. Lyons and Co., a Jewish-owned company. (She had graduated from Oxford in 1947 with a degree in chemistry.) After quitting chemistry, she became a barrister and grew increasingly involved in politics. She ran for office in some of the more conservative districts and lost each time. Thatcher finally won when she ran in Finchley, a safe Tory seat in a north London borough. Finally she had found her constituents: middle-class, entrepreneurial, Jewish suburbanites. She particularly loved the way her new constituents took care of one another, rather than looking to the state: “In the thirty-three years that I represented [Finchley],” she later wrote, “I never had a Jew come in poverty and desperation to one of my [town meetings],” and she often wished that Christians “would take closer note of the Jewish emphasis on self-help and acceptance of personal responsibility.” She was a founding member of the Anglo-Israel Friendship League of Finchley and a member of the Conservative Friends of Israel. Aghast that a golf club in her district consistently barred Jews from becoming members, she publicly protested against it. She even joined in the singing of the Israeli national anthem in 1975 at Finchley.

The Jews of Finchley were “her people,” Thatcher used to say—certainly much more so than the wealthy land barons that dominated her party.

[…]

Thatcher appointed whomever she liked to positions in her government, whatever their religious or family background. Chaim Bermant, the Anglo-Jewish writer, probably went too far when he said Thatcher has “an almost mystical faith in Jewish abilities,” but he wasn’t completely off the mark. In addition to Nigel Lawson, she appointed Victor Rothschild as her security adviser, Malcolm Rifkind to be secretary of state for Scotland, David Young as minister without portfolio, and Leon Brittan to be trade and industry secretary. David Wolfson, nephew of Sir Isaac Wolfson, president of Great Universal Stores, Europe’s biggest mail-order company, served as Thatcher’s chief of staff. Her policies were powered by two men—Keith Joseph, a member of Parliament many thought would one day be the first prime minister who was a practicing Jew, and Alfred Sherman, a former communist turned free-market thinker.

[…]

Thatcher’s philo-Semitism went beyond the people she appointed to her government; it had clear political implications as well. She made Jewish causes her own, including by easing the restrictions on prosecuting Nazi war criminals living in Britain and pleading the cause of the Soviet Union’s refuseniks. She boasted that she once made Soviet officials “nervous” by repeatedly bringing up the refuseniks’ plight during a single nine-hour meeting with Mikhail Gorbachev, “The Soviets had to know that every time we met their treatment of the refuseniks would be thrown back at them,” she explained in her book The Downing Street Years. Thatcher also worked to end the British government’s support for the Arab boycott of Israel. During the Yom Kippur War of 1973, Thatcher criticized Tory Prime Minister Ted Heath’s refusal to supply Israel with military parts or even allow American planes to supply Israel from British airfields. In 1986, Thatcher became the first British prime minister to visit Israel, having previously visited twice as a member of parliament.

Read more.

Yom Hashoah, observance of which started at sunset last evening, will continue until sunset tonight.  Instagram Blog has set up a feed for user pictures here with the text below and has links to photos with the hashtag #YomHaShoah and a Vad Yashem page with photos.

From sunset today to sunset tomorrow marks Yom HaShoah (יום השואה), a day to honor the memory of the six million Jews who died in the Holocaust.

Yom HaShoah is a national holiday in Israel, commemorated by speeches by the President and Prime Minister at Yad Vashem, the lighting of six torches by Holocaust survivors, prayers by the chief rabbis and two minutes of silence across the nation. While other countries have their own Holocaust days as well, many Jews around the world also observe the day at home and at important historical sites.

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment »

Gov. Palin: The Grocer’s Daughter Broke a Class Ceiling as Well as a Glass Ceiling

Posted by Dr. Fay on April 8, 2013

Governor Palin’s excellent article posted at National Review today:

April 8, 2013 4:30 P.M.

The Grocer’s Daughter

Margaret Thatcher not only broke a glass ceiling; she broke a class ceiling.

By Sarah Palin

Today we say goodbye to a towering figure of the 20th century. With the passing of Margaret Thatcher, we’ve sadly lost the last living member of that great triumvirate that included Ronald Reagan and John Paul II — those giants who defeated the evil empire of Soviet Communism and allowed the liberation of its captive nations. We’ve also lost one of the great champions of economic freedom and democratic ideals.

Many will focus on the fact that Margaret Thatcher’s career was a collection of “firsts” for women — she was the first and youngest female Conservative-party member to stand for election, the first woman to hold the title Leader of the Opposition, and the first woman prime minister of the United Kingdom.

But Thatcher not only broke a glass ceiling; she broke a class ceiling. She was a grocer’s daughter from the back of beyond who advanced to the height of power in a class-conscious society. Like her friend Ronald Reagan, she was an underestimated underdog and political outsider. Simon Jenkins, the former editor of the Evening Standard, once said, “There was no Thatcher group within the Tory Party. . . . She was utterly and completely on her own. She simply was an outsider in every way.”

She was at heart a populist taking on the Conservative party’s old guard, who disdainfully referred to her as “That Woman.” The disdain was mutual. She referred to them as “the not so grand grandees.” As Thatcher later said, “It didn’t matter what they called me as long as I got the job done. I mean, to me they were ‘Those Grandees.’ They just don’t know what life is like. They haven’t been through it. And eventually if they didn’t help our cause, they had to go. But it didn’t bother me too much that they were patronizing like that. Frankly, the people, who are the true gentlemen, deal with others for what they are, not who their father was. Let’s face it: Maybe it took ‘That Woman’ to get things done, and the real reason why they said it was because they knew they just hadn’t got it within them to see things through.”

In taking on “Those Grandees,” she wasn’t afraid of having strong opinions and fighting for them — something the establishment often found distasteful. British ambassador Sir Anthony Parsons recalled a conversation about this: “She said, ‘You know, Tony, I’m very proud that I don’t belong to your class.’ I said, ‘Prime Minister, what class do you think I belong to?’ She said, ‘I’m talking of course about upper-middle-class intellectuals who see everybody else’s point of view and have none of their own.’” And, of course, like all conservatives and trailblazers, she had to endure more than her share of vicious media attacks. Sir Archie Hamilton once recounted how he asked Thatcher whether she read the daily newspapers. “‘Oh no!’ she replied, ‘They make such hurtful and damaging remarks about me and my family, that if I ever read the papers every day, I could never get on with the job I am here to do.’” I know exactly what she meant. And as she said, “I always cheer up immensely if an attack is particularly wounding because I think, well, if they attack one personally, it means they have not a single political argument left.”

Anyone witnessing her brilliant debating skills in the House of Commons can understand why her opponents were reduced to childish attacks. She passionately demolished all their arguments with facts.

Thatcher didn’t have powerful patronage. All she had were powerful ideas, ideas based on liberty. During a meeting about the Conservative party’s best course to take in the economic crisis of the 1970s, some so-called pragmatist was arguing in favor of a Third Way between free-market capitalism and socialism. Before he was even finished, Thatcher reached for her handbag, pulled out a copy of Hayek’s The Constitution of Liberty, threw it on the table, and said, “This is what we believe in!”

She put those beliefs into action. Like Reagan, she was a leader for whom word and deed were one and the same. A leader of a conservative think tank behind the Thatcher revolution famously said, “We were not interested in political office for the Conservative party. We were interested in power for them to get things done.” And that’s exactly what Thatcher did. While others in her party were interested in holding on to political office and overseeing “the orderly management of [Britain’s] decline,” she actually radically reformed a broken system and brought it back to free-market principles, leaving her country stronger, wealthier, and a leader in the world when just a decade before it had been dismissed as “the sick man of Europe.” Her push to privatize British industry and lower tax rates led to a substantial economic expansion and became a model for other countries shrugging off the yoke of socialism.

She was a visionary always ahead of her time because her vision was rooted in time-tested truths about man’s fallibilities and aspirations. Today, in light of Europe’s sovereign-debt crisis, all observers can recognize the wisdom of her unflinching defense of national sovereignty and democratic accountability. I’m sure there are many Europeans today who wish their leaders were as prescient as Britain’s Thatcher in her skepticism of ceding control to a centralized continental bureaucracy.

She was above all a patriot who loved her “Land of Hope and Glory” with all her heart and believed in its greatness and its history as the “Mother of the Free.” As her current successor in 10 Downing Street said, “She didn’t just lead our country; she saved our country.” And she changed the world in the process.

The grocer’s daughter from Grantham became freedom’s Iron Lady at a time when too many were soft and equivocating. She is sadly gone now, but her intrepid will, her time-tested ideals, her unfailing trust in what is right and just, and her legacy, as solid as iron, will live on forever.

— Sarah Palin, the former governor of Alaska, was the 2008 Republican nominee for vice president.

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Gov. Palin: Baroness Thatcher was a trailblazer and her legacy will live in perpetuity

Posted by Dr. Fay on April 8, 2013

Governor Palin expressed her sadness today at the death of one of her role models:

______________

We’re deeply saddened at the loss of Margaret Thatcher. While the Iron Lady is sadly gone, her iron will, her unfailing trust in what is right and just, and her lessons to all of us will live on forever. She was a trailblazer like no other. We lost an icon, but her legacy, as solid as iron, will live on in perpetuity.

_______________

– Sarah Palin

In her birthday wishes to Baroness Thatcher in 2009, Governor Palin said this of the former Prime Minister:

Baroness Thatcher continues to remain a role model to many people, particularly women, around the world.  Her career is a collection of “firsts.”  She was the youngest female Conservative Party member to stand for election in history, she was the first woman to hold the title Leader of the Opposition, and she was the first woman to become Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.

__________

As Prime Minister, she took an active role in defending economic freedom and democratic ideals.  Her push to privatize British industry and lower tax rates led to a substantial economic expansion in the United Kingdom.  She was just as influential in foreign policy.  Along with President Ronald Reagan and Pope John Paul II, Prime Minister Thatcher recognized the evil of Communism and worked tirelessly to erode the power and influence of the Soviet Union.

________

Her life and career serve as a blueprint for overcoming the odds and challenging the “status quo.”  She started life as a grocer’s daughter from Grantham and rose to become Prime Minister – all by her own merit and hard work.  I cherish the accomplishments of Margaret Thatcher and will always count her as one of my role models.

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UPDATED: Gov. Palin aghast that progressives at MSNBC think children do not belong to their parents

Posted by Dr. Fay on April 8, 2013

UPDATE:  Governor Palin followed up with these two tweets today.  Note the new hashtag:  #kidsbelongtous.

[https://twitter.com/SarahPalinUSA/status/321737926016913408]

[https://twitter.com/SarahPalinUSA/status/321741969963499520]

Original post:

Governor Palin was aghast at the statements in this MSNBC video posted by Bestviewsforlife.  Of course, the views expressed by Harris-Perry are consistent with the recent drive for universal preschool.  Obviously, progressives are not content with indoctrinating our public school students from grade school through college with liberal dogma and propaganda.  Now they want our preschoolers too.


An expanded view of the commentary beneath the video includes these comments:

The latest MSNBC “Lean Forward” spot featuring Melissa Harris-Perry is a collection of tired progressive cliches on steroids that harken back to the Clinton era. It really outdoes all previous “Lean Forward” ads.

]…]

There’s so much about this short spot that’s just troubling and wrong that we have to break it down piece by piece.

________
We have never invested as much in public education as we should have because…

____________
Yeah, no. We spend more on education per-student than every country in the world according to the latest OECD Education at a Glance report. If you want to twist the numbers more and view our spending as a percentage of our GDP we come in a very close fifth behind Denmark, New Zealand, Iceland, and South Korea. So Harris-Perry’s allegation that “we have never invested as much in public education as we should have” is totally false.

[…]
we’ve always had a private notion of children, your kid is yours and totally your responsibility. We haven’t had a very collective notion of these are our children. So part of it is we have to break through our kind of private idea that kids belong to their parents or kids belong to their families and recognize that kids belong to whole communities.

___________
There’s some startling stuff in there. Kids don’t just belong to their parents; in Harris-Perry’s world they belong to the collective whole, the community. They are the responsibility of everyone.

[…]

Earlier in her career, during a more gentle time, she was less open to the collective dictating household decisions on things like reproductive health and marriage arrangements. It appears now that Harris-Perry has come around to fully believing that, yes, only good things can come through collective action even when they intrude on private household decisions like child rearing.

[…]

This broader collective theme of child rearing she has should be roundly rejected by all sane people. Pooling community resources together to educate our children, even if it is done by force, is one thing but suggesting that we need to dissolve the traditional bonds between parent and child for the good of the greater collective is off the charts crazy

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment »

Palin & Brewer Participating in Hope & a Future’s 4th Annual Strikeout Child Abuse Walk (Updated)

Posted by Jackie Siciliano on April 8, 2013

Update:

Sarah Palin updated her Facebook page to promote this event:

Please join Gov. Brewer and my family at Hope & A Future’s Strikeout Child Abuse Walk this Saturday at 3pm in Phoenix, Arizona. April is Child Abuse Prevention Month, so join us and make a difference. Learn more and register at http://www.azhope.com/fundraising/strikeout.php

 

From the Facebook page of Arizonia Governor Jan Brewer:

This Saturday at 3pm in downtown Phoenix, join me and Sarah Palin at Hope & A Future’s 4th Annual Strikeout Child Abuse Walk. The walk concludes at Chase Field where we’ll watch the Arizona Diamondbacks.

April is Child Abuse Prevention Month, so join us and make a difference. Learn more and register at http://www.azhope.com/fundraising/strikeout.php

Governor Brewer also shared the following link to Hope and a Future.

h/t 1*Sherrie at Team Sarah

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Palin: May We Never Forget

Posted by Jackie Siciliano on April 8, 2013

Sarah Palin takes time to remind us of Holocaust Remembrance Day.  From Palin’s Facebook page:

May we never forget.

Palin then linked to this story from the Jerusalem Post:

Israel prepares for Holocaust Remembrance Day

Holocaust_rem_day

Preparations are underway across the country for the observance of Holocaust Remembrance Day, which begins on Sunday evening.

The central theme of this year’s ceremony is defiance and rebellion during the Holocaust, Yad Vashem announced, marking 70 years since the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising.

Memorial activities will begin with a state ceremony at Yad Vashem’s Warsaw Ghetto Square at 8 p.m., during which President Shimon Peres and Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu will deliver addresses. Canadian Foreign Minister John Baird will also be in attendance.

Yad Vashem chairman Avner Shalev will light a memorial torch, followed by Holocaust survivors Otto Pressburger, Eliezer Eizenschmidt, Miriam Liptcher and Baruch Kopold who will light torches. Sima Hochman will light the first torch in place of her husband, Peretz, who passed away last week. More.

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