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Archive for September 23rd, 2009

Palin in Hong Kong

Posted by Shane Vander Hart on September 23, 2009

PalinCSLA

In a speech that I thought Governor Sarah Palin was giving today, but then I remembered that today was yesterday in Hong Kong… and tomorrow is today, sigh – darned International Date Line.  Some excerpts of her speech at the CLSA Asia Pacific Markets Conference posted on WSJ’s Washington Wire:

A few snippets… you can read the rest there.

On Conservatism:

You can call me a common-sense conservative. My approach to the issues facing my country and the world, issues that we’ll discuss today, are rooted in this common-sense conservatism… Common sense conservatism deals with the reality of the world as it is. Complicated and beautiful, tragic and hopeful, we believe in the rights and the responsibilities and the inherent dignity of the individual.

We don’t believe that human nature is perfectible; we’re suspicious of government efforts to fix problems because often what it’s trying to fix is human nature, and that is impossible. It is what it is. But that doesn’t mean that we’re resigned to, well, any negative destiny. Not at all. I believe in striving for the ideal, but in realistic confines of human nature…

Regarding our financial crisis:

Lack of government wasn’t the problem. Government policies were the problem. The marketplace didn’t fail. It became exactly as common sense would expect it to. The government ordered the loosening of lending standards. The Federal Reserve kept interest rates low. The government forced lending institutions to give loans to people who, as I say, couldn’t afford them. Speculators spotted new investment vehicles, jumped on board and rating agencies underestimated risks.

On Cap-and-Tax:

American jobs in every industry will be threatened by the rising cost of doing business under this cap-and-tax plan. The cost of farming will certainly increase. That’s going to drive up the cost of groceries and drive down farm incomes. The cost of manufacturing, warehousing and transportation will also rise. We are all going to feel the effects. The Americans hardest hit will be those who are already struggling to make ends meet today, much less with this new tax every month…

On China:

The more politically open and just China is, the more Chinese citizens of every ethnic group will be able to settle disputes in court rather than on the streets. The more open it is, the less we’ll be concerned about its military buildup and its intentions. The more transparent China is, the more likely it is that they will find a true and lasting friendship based on shared values as well as interests. And I’m not talking about a U.S.-led democracy crusade. [We’re] not going to impose our values on other countries. We don’t seek to do that. But the ideas of freedom and liberty and respect for human rights, it’s not just a U.S. idea. They’re very much more than that. They’re enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and many other international covenants and treaties.

Be sure to read the whole post over at Washington Wire.

Josh Painter posted on early reaction to her speech from people who expressed their thoughts using social media.  The New York Times wrote a rare positive article on her speech:

A number of people who heard the speech in a packed hotel ballroom, which was closed to the media, said Mrs. Palin spoke from notes for 90 minutes and that she was articulate, well-prepared and even compelling.

“The speech was wide-ranging, very balanced, and she beat all expectations,” said Doug A. Coulter, head of private equity in the Asia-Pacific region for LGT Capital Partners…

…A number of attendees thought Mrs. Palin, the former vice presidential candidate, was using the speech to begin to broaden her foreign policy credentials before making a run for the presidency in 2012.

“She’s definitely a serious future presidential candidate, and I understand why she plays so well in middle America,” said Mr. Coulter, a Canadian….

…Melvin Goodé, a regional marketing consultant, thought Mrs. Palin chose Hong Kong because, he said, it was “a place where things happen and where freedom can be expanded upon.”

“It’s not Beijing or Shanghai,” said Mr. Goodé . “She also mentioned Tibet, Burma and North Korea in the same breath as places where China should be more sensitive and careful about how people are treated. She said it on a human-rights level.”

Mr. Goodé, an African-American who said he did some campaign polling for President Obama, said Mrs. Palin mentioned President Obama three times on Wednesday.

“And there was nothing derogatory in it, no sleight of hand, and believe me, I was listening for that,” he said, adding that Mrs. Palin referred to Mr. Obama as “our president,” with the emphasis on “our.”

Mr. Goodé, a New Yorker who said he would never vote for Mrs. Palin, said she acquitted herself well.

“They really prepared her well,” he said. “She was articulate and she held her own. I give her credit. They’ve tried to categorize her as not being bright. She’s bright.”

Then the Wall Street Journal in an Op/Ed posted this afternoon says that Governor Palin understand Beijing better than the Obama Administration does.

Mrs. Palin sees China’s authoritarian nature as a security concern for the U.S. and its allies in Asia-Pacific, and she has a point. North Korea, Burma and other rogue regimes couldn’t sustain themselves without Chinese support. Not to mention the hundreds of missiles Beijing has pointed at Taiwan and its navy’s increasingly muscular attitude in the South China Sea…

…Mrs. Palin also espoused the value of alliances with like-minded democratic countries in the region such as Japan, Australia and India. The U.S. "can, must and should" work with China to address issues of "mutual concern," she said. "But we also need to work with our allies in addressing the uncertainties created by China’s rise."

The Obama Administration could take a page from this book. So far, the White House has gone out of its way to downplay human rights in China and tiptoe around recent crackdowns in Tibet and Xinjiang, preferring to focus on hipper issues like climate change. This "don’t ask, don’t tell" approach to Beijing does no favors to the Chinese people, much less to the West’s core interests in Asia. At the same time, America’s other alliances in the region have been largely ignored. (read the whole article)

Well done Governor Palin in your debut on the paid speaker’s circuit.  A good step in building up foreign policy cred.

Shane Vander Hart is the editor of Caffeinated Thoughts.  You can follow him on Twitter and also friend him on Facebook.

Posted in Caffeinated Thoughts, cap and tax, GOP / Conservative, Governor Sarah Palin | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Gov. Palin’s Hong Kong Speech: Reagan Resurrected

Posted by Ron Devito on September 23, 2009

Video

Video Courtesy of New England Cable News (NECN)

Photo Spread

Photo Courtesy of CLSA. Governor Palin delivers 90-minute Reagan Conservative speech in Hong Kong.

Photo Courtesy of CLSA. CLSA Chairman and CEO, Jonathan Slone introduces Governor Palin and “quoted President Eisenhower on the responsibilities of citizens in a democratic society to debate issues that matter (Wheeler, 2009, ¶3).

Photo Courtesy of CLSA. Governor Palin delivers 90-minute Reagan Conservative speech in Hong Kong.

Synopsis and Distillation

The Wall Street Journal’s reportage focused on Governor Palin’s Reagan Conservatism; Bloomberg focused on her statements pertaining to the Federal Reserve, and perhaps the most surprising coverage of all came from the New York Times.

New York Times

“A number of people who heard the speech in a packed hotel ballroom…said…she was articulate, well-prepared and even compelling” (McDonald, 2009, ¶2). “Doug A. Coulter, head of private equity in the Asia-Pacific region for LGT Capital Partners” said Governor Palin “beat all expectations (McDonald, 2009, ¶3). “Cameron Sinclair, another speaker at the event, said Mrs. Palin emphasized the need for a grassroots rebirth of the Republican Party driven by party leaders outside Washington” (McDonald, 2009, ¶6). ” ‘She’s definitely a serious future presidential candidate, and I understand why she plays so well in middle America,’ said Mr. Coulter, a Canadian” (McDonald, 2009, ¶8).

The most salient quotes came from Melvin Goodé, a regional marketing consultant, who is African-American and an Obama supporter. “[Governor] Palin chose Hong Kong because, he said, it was “a place where things happen and where freedom can be expanded upon” (McDonald, 2009, ¶16). “It’s not Beijing or Shanghai,” he said (McDonald, 2009, ¶17). Mr. Goodé’s closing remarks: “She was articulate and she held her own. I give her credit. They’ve tried to categorize her as not being bright. She’s bright” (McDonald, 2009, ¶21). This is from an Obama supporter!

Bloomberg

The Fed and the government sent a message to companies that “the bigger that you are, the more problems that you get yourself into, the more likely the government is to bail you out,” Palin said in the closed door speech, according to a tape of the event given to Bloomberg News. “Of course the little guys are left out then. We’re left holding the bag, all the moms and pops all over America” (Kate & Chan, 2009, ¶3).

“How can we think that setting up the Fed as monitor of systemic risk in the financial sector will result in meaningful reform,” she said. “The words ‘fox’ and ‘henhouse’ come to mind” (Kate & Chan, 2009, ¶9).

Wall Street Journal

“We got into this mess because of government interference in the first place….We’re not interested in government fixes, we’re interested in freedom,” Governor Palin said (Cheng & Frangos, 2009, ¶2).

“She described her political philosophy as a ‘common-sense conservatism,’ and said the free-market policies of Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher should be guides for how to get out of the current economic situation. ‘Liberalism holds that there is no human problem that government can’t fix if only the right people are put in charge,’ she said” (Cheng & Frangos, 2009, ¶7).

“She called for tax cuts as well as the elimination of the capital-gains and estate tax. Then, she said, the world will ‘watch the U.S. economy roar back to life’” (Cheng & Frangos, 2009, ¶11).

“‘We all hope to see a China that is stable and peaceful and prosperous,’ she said. But she added that the U.S. must work with Asian allies in case ‘China goes in a different direction’” (Cheng & Frangos, 2009, ¶14). “On U.S.-China trade relations, Ms. Palin called for more openness and warned against protectionism. ‘We need China to improve its rule of law, and protect our intellectual property,’ she said. ‘On our part, we should be more open to Chinese investment where our national security interests are not threatened’” (Cheng & Frangos, 2009, ¶16).

Commentary

The foregoing compilation clearly documents 90 minutes of pure Reagan Conservatism. In her speech, Governor Palin called for small limited government, states rights, and peace through strength. Supporting the thesis that Governor Palin’s appeal stretches from full right to center-left, she wowed even a die-hard Obama supporter with her speech.

Facebook user Catherine Yu Yeun Chen wrote on Governor Palin’s Facebook Wall that a friend who was present at the speech reported “Sarah Palin was received with the biggest round of applause. It took three minutes at least before she was able to start her speech…”

This was absolutely a defining moment and a major accomplishment for Governor Palin. Today, an Obama supporter regarded her as brilliant. Today, the New York Times, that bastion of liberalism declared that Governor Palin is a credible candidate for 2012.

For this speech, Governor Palin earned a sum at least equal to an entire year of gubernatorial pay and one fifth of Obama’s pay. Women all over the world should hold their heads high today. The world is trembling beneath her sonic boom, glass is exploding and the shards are falling to earth….

References

Cheng J. and Frangos, A. (2009, September 23). “Palin Addresses Asian Investors.” Wall Street Journal. Retrieved September 23, 2009 from: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB125368057547633229.html

In Hong Kong, Palin touts ‘Main Sreet, U.S.A’. (2009, September 23). NECN. Retrieved September 23, 2009 from: http://www.necn.com/Boston/World/2009/09/23/In-Hong-Kong-Palin-touts/1253706988.html

Kate, D. T. and Chan, C. (2009, September 23). “Palin attacks Fed on Hong Kong visit, Wants ‘Responsible China.’ ” Bloomberg News. Retrieved September 23, 2009 from: http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601074&sid=aDptsOIuwheU

McDonald, M. (2009, September 23). “Palin Speaks to Investors in Hong Kong.” The New York Times. Retrieved September 23, 2009 from: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/24/us/politics/24palin.html

Wheeler, S. (2009, September 23). Governor Sarah Palin address 16th CLSA Investors’ Forum”. Credit Lyonnais Securities Asia. Retrieved September 23, 2009 from: https://www.clsa.com/about-clsa/media-centre/2009-Media-releases/governor-sarah-palin-address-16th-clsa-investors-forum.php

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Gov. Palin Lambastes Obama’s Spending in Hong Kong Speech

Posted by Ron Devito on September 23, 2009

According to Agence France Presse, Governor Palin said on September 23, 2009 the US government was wasting taxpayer’s money and would exacerbate poverty in a 75-minute speech delivered to investors at the CLSA Investors Forum in Hong Kong (CLSA, 2009, ¶1).

The speech “covered Alaska, international terrorism, US economic policy and trade with China”(CLSA, 2009, ¶2). An anonymous European delegate regarded her as “brilliant.” (CLSA, 2009, ¶5). The delegate elaborated, “She said America was spending a lot of money and it was a temporary solution. Normal people are having to pay more and more but things don’t get better. The rich will leave the country and the poor will get poorer” (CLSA, 2009, ¶6).

She said the Obama’s imposition of duties on Chinese imports was harmful to our relationship with China (CLSA, 2009, ¶11). Governor Palin praised President Reagan’s economic policies and lambasted the Obama administration’s interventions in economic affairs (CLSA, 2009, ¶12). She addressed terrorism threats to the United States and traditional allies such as Japan, Australia, and South Korea (CLSA, 2009, ¶13).

Governor Palin “blasted Obama’s proposals on healthcare, reiterating a previous statement made to the press that the plan would include a bureaucratic ‘death panel’ that would decide who gets assistance, he said (CLSA, 2009, ¶20).

Commentary

Though no transcript of the speech is available, the Agence France Press (AFP) report as re-broadcast by Breitbart provides a solid summary of what she spoke about and audience reaction. Those with left-leaning ideologies naturally did not like what Governor Palin had to say, and while there were a few of those (CLSA, 2009, ¶4 , 7), most investors liked her speech as indicated by the delegate who regarded it as brilliant.

One investor complained the speech over-focused on Alaska as an investment opportunity (CLSA, 2009, ¶15-16). But, Governor Palin is from Alaska, and that state is a significant trading port, and the place to invest in energy markets. If there was over-focus on Alaska, it will likely diminish over time, as Governor Palin transitions into a national role.

For her first foreign speaking engagement, Governor Palin’s performance was by this account, nothing short of spectacular.

References

Palin slams Obama’s spending in debut speech in Asia. (2009, September 23). Agence France Press. Retrieved September 23, 2009 from: http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=CNG.5c890613297fae5a68cbf119a882edf8.191&show_article=1

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