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Rick Perry is no Sarah Palin

Posted by joshpainter on August 8, 2011

- by Josh Painter
*
Gov. Rick Perry appears poised to announce next week that he’s going to make a run for the White House. Aaron Blake and Chris Cillizza of the Washington Post report that the Texas governor’s supporters are already soliciting donations for the coming Perry campaign:

Texas Gov. Rick Perry (R) is expected to announce his presidential plans shortly after the Ames Straw Poll this coming weekend, and his supporters are already soliciting contributions for the campaign, according to an e-mail from a Perry supporter.

The e-mail from Gene Powell, a real-estate executive who Perry appointed to the University of Texas board of regents, states, “We expect that announcement in a week to ten days” and tells people to start writing checks today.

It is further evidence that Perry is truly ramping up for a 2012 presidential campaign, even though a top Perry adviser says the e-mail’s timeframe isn’t hard and fast.

Perry adviser David Carney told The Fix that the no one should read too much into the e-mail, which he says contains some factual inaccuracies.

“While we are encouraged by this enthusiasm, we have not made the final decision, as even this email indicates,” Carney wrote in an e-mail, “and there are some other items in that email that are incorrect, but it just goes to demonstrate how excited some of our folks are.”

Carney said the timeframe for the possible campaign continues to be “this summer with Labor Day as the outlier.”

If he announces as expected, we may give up on trying to read the tea leaves. Back on May 19, we didn’t believe Perry was seriously considering a run for president because:

If Perry does allow himself to be persuaded to chase the bandwagons to the White House along with the other big dogs, it would be the biggest flip-flop since John Kerry voted for the $87 billion before he voted against it. After all, Perry stated in November of last year:

“I’ve made my decision. If I really believe in the 10th amendment, then being a governor of a state is where the action is.”

Asked during a GOP gubernatorial debate on Jan. 29 whether he would serve his full four-year term if re-elected, Perry answered that he would “absolutely” as long as the Lord lets him live that long:

“If your intent here is to question where I would want to go any better than being the governor of the state of Texas, that place hasn’t been made yet,” Perry said.

Perry told the Daily Beast’s Andrew Romano just nine months ago that he was “Not going to run for president.” Silly us. At the time, we believed Perry to be cut from the same cloth as Sarah Palin, someone who means what they say. But intensive research over the months has informed us that any resemblance between Perry and Palin is purely superficial.

Unlike the 2008 GOP vice presidential nominee, what Perry says can’t be taken to the bank, and there are other significant differences. She’s a political reformer; he goes with the flow. She’s a small-government Reagan conservative; he’s much closer to the GOP establishment than his feud with the Republican Party’s Bush wing would lead you to believe. She left Alaska with a $12 billion surplus; he’s saddled Texas with twice the debt and doubled state spending on his watch. Rick Perry is a good ol’ boy, but the last person we need in the White House is another good ol’ boy. Unfortunately, Rick Perry is no Sarah Palin.

Cross-posted from Brazos Valley Pundit

- JP

Posted in 2012, GOP Nominee, Republican Party, rick perry, Sarah Palin | 2 Comments »

So Mike Huckabee is not running…

Posted by joshpainter on May 15, 2011

- by Josh Painter
*
Mike Huckabee has made his announcement. He’s not going to seek the 2012 Republican presidential nomination. How does his decision affect Sarah Palin? Well, that depends on a number of things.

The factor Texas for Sarah Palin is most concerned about tonight is her army of supporters. We here at this blog want to see that army grow. As many pundits, paid professionals and armchair amateurs alike, believe that no small number of Huckabee’s supporters — evangelicals in particular — would find that coming on board for Sarah Palin would be a natural fit. But Herman Cain, Newt Gingrich and Michele Bachmann also stand to gain some troops from the Huckabee ranks. The former Arkansas governor’s more committed supporters will be less inclined to move into the Palin camp if they notice Palin supporters trashing their guy. Any swipes of a personal nature taken at Mike Huckabee by Palin supporters will be taken personally by Huckabee’s supporters.

As Palin supporters, don’t we see that personal attacks upon her are also attacks on ourselves? And if some Palin supporters are making such attacks on Huckabee, what are his followers more likely to do? Will they let it pass and support her anyway? Not when they’re burning from that sort of attack. They will swear an oath not to give her their support — not because of anything Gov. Palin said or did — but because of the people who are supposed to be advancing her cause and her political prospects. She has been most kind and gracious toward her potential rivals. Even some who have said unkind things about her have received only humorous retorts from her in response. Which is right out of the WWRRD book (What Would Ronald Reagan Do?).

Palin supporters would do well to follow the governor’s example. Nothing is to be gained for Sarah Palin by attacking Mike Huckabee’s character. His record, his policies and even the manner in which he made tonight’s announcement are all fair game. But Palin people should keep their opinions on Huckabee’s character to themselves. We are all children of God, and we all struggle with our own personal issues. Like Gov. Palin does, let’s let our faith guide us during what could be a defining moment in her political career. As Jesus told his disciples in the Book of Matthew (7:12 AKJ):

“Therefore all things whatever you would that men should do to you, do you even so to them: for this is the law and the prophets.”

So let us treat Gov. Palin’s political rivals, whether in the race or not, as we would have them treat her. Thomas Schmitz was especially gracious on Twitter this evening:

.@GovMikeHuckabee: Good luck, U weren’t my choice for the nomination but I wish U well. P.S. I love the cartoons!

.

Now that’s class, guys. Not only is it the right thing to do, but it shows the way to win friends for Governor Palin. If she gets into the race, she’s going to need all of the supporters we can help to bring over to her side, considering the type of campaign that the Democrats and some Republicans will wage against her. Besides, if you burn bridges, it makes it extremely difficult for those on the other side to cross over to yours.

Cross-posted from Texas for Sarah Palin

- JP

Posted in 2012, GOP, Mike Huckabee, Republican Party, Sarah Palin | 2 Comments »

Palin – Ryan 2012?

Posted by joshpainter on April 6, 2011

- by Josh Painter
*
Jonah Goldberg makes the case for Paul Ryan as the 2012 GOP vice presidential nominee:

That would require taking off from the budget committee from August to November — unless of course the Republicans won, in which case he’d have to take off considerably more time.

Meanwhile, there’s really no one who unifies the party more than Ryan and, with the possible exception of Rubio, there’s nobody who’d make a more formidable or attractive vice presidential candidate. I’m sure many of the presidential candidates would be uneasy about tapping Ryan since it would probably mean endorsing Ryan’s plan to one extent or another.

Ah, but Sarah Palin has already done that, calling it “serious & necessary reform” and a “good start” toward a balanced federal budget.

Yes, speculation about a possible vice presidential candidate at this stage of the banquet is a bit like putting the dessert before the salad, but it’s interesting food for thought nevertheless.

Cross-posted from Texas for Sarah Palin

- JP

Posted in 2012, GOP, Republican Party, Sarah Palin, Vice President | Tagged: , | Leave a Comment »

Riehl: Why They Really Fear Sarah Palin, And Why She Should Run

Posted by joshpainter on March 18, 2011

- by Josh Painter
*
At Riehl World View, blogger Dan Riel opines that if Gov. Palin gets in the 2012 presidential race, it would force some of those who are currently attacking her through surrogates and media operatives to “take to the spotlight and deal with her one on one”:

Many people think the DC GOP establishment fears and constantly attacks Sarah Palin because they’re afraid she could become president. But that can’t really be true, can it? If they believe she’s everything they think and say she is, or isn’t, along with being so utterly unqualified, she doesn’t have a prayer of becoming president. Right? And don’t kid yourself that they think differently about her than they increasingly openly claim. I’m just not sure they even understand why they do; it’s more instinctual, than anything, embedded within their instinct to survive.

But, ironically, that’s the key to why they really hate her and what she does without seemingly trying. And she does it even as they attack her. In the first place, they do fear she might become president, or at least win the nomination. So, what does that say as regards how they really think about you, or “we the people,” as it were. Well, obviously, they think you’re stupid because they can’t trust you to not elect someone they perceive as so dumb, and/or unfit.

Yet, as an aside, these same people, even ones who officially campaigned against Obama, never claimed Obama was fundamentally unfit, now did they? Yet, time has proven precisely that. So, just how smart are these people?

The point is, attacking her while believing she’s totally unfit to become president makes little sense and is a profound waste of their supposedly so valuable time – unless it exposes them in terms of what they think about the average Republican voter and American in general.

It’s precisely because Palin so often does this, exposes them for what they actually are, that whether she ever runs for president, or not, they feel compelled to destroy her. They don’t simply not want her to run for president; if they could, they would remove her entirely from the national stage because she’s such a threat.

If it fears anything, the Beltway establishment, both Left and Right, fears being exposed as chiefly a game of self-professed, elitist, political power-sharing ping pong playing individuals who are absolutely convinced that they, and not the American people, are capable of steering America’s course. They also believe that only they are entitled to do it, hence the attacks on almost any genuine citizen, or Tea Party-aligned candidate – along with dressing up some typical GOP hacks as Tea Party-aligned to win. Some of them are now being exposed by their votes.

[More]

Cross-posted from Texas for Sarah Palin

- JP

Posted in 2012, GOP, Republican Party, Sarah Palin | Leave a Comment »

The Ticket: Palin and Huckabee sent aides to RNC meeting on 2012

Posted by joshpainter on March 12, 2011

- by Josh Painter
*
From Holly Bailey at Yahoo’s The Ticket blog:

Sarah Palin and Mike Huckabee have been cagey about whether they’ll run for president in 2012. But the pair still sent political aides to a meeting at the Republican National Committee this week about party logistics headed into next year’s presidential campaign

According to Politico’s Jonathan Martin, newly elected RNC chief Reince Priebus convened the meeting, which included staffers from the potential Palin and Huckabee campaigns, as well as aides representing all-but-declared candidates Tim Pawlenty and Mitt Romney. Notably, Mitch Daniels, who said last week that Indiana’s budget crisis might curtail his 2012 efforts, didn’t send anyone to the meeting.

Is it true? Considering that it comes from fact-challenged Politico, who knows? Nevertheless, this should add plenty of fuel to keep the ol’ media speculation motor spinning…

Cross-posted from Texas for Sarah Palin

- JP

Posted in 2012, GOP, Republican Party, RNC, Sarah Palin | Leave a Comment »

Why Karl Rove is childishly mocking Gov. Palin

Posted by joshpainter on March 2, 2011

- by Josh Painter
*
Karl Rove, the architect of a Bush presidency that saw its approval numbers drop to 28 percent in 2008 (the same as Jimmy Carter’s in 1979), is now the spokesman for the Bush wing of the Republican Party, also known as the GOP establishment. The political left, which hated Rove with a purple passion when he was in the White House, now gleefully quotes him every time he takes a swipe at the Tea Party and Sarah Palin. Rove knows full well that every time he swings his Louisville Slugger at her, the Democrat/Media Complex will give his words sufficient amplification to reach every television, radio and internet connection in the western world.

With this in mind, in an interview with the hard left New York Magazine, Rove went back to the schoolyard to engage in childish mockery of Gov. Palin. He knew that this tactic would be a big hit with the political left because the tenor of leftist attacks on Reagan conservatives often resembles the taunts of middle school bullies on their worst behavior.

The governor’s recently-hired chief of staff’s comments, when asked if Sarah Palin would like to have Rove available as an advisor, highlight the battle lines that have been drawn within the Grand Old Party:

Does the next candidate of the GOP want the mark of “Bush’s Brain” on their candidacy? To alienate the tea party by ?cozying up to the elitist Rasputin?

Certainly not Sarah Palin. “Of all the potential candidates, Governor Palin would no doubt be the one desiring new energy and ideas,” says her chief of staff Michael Glassner, “and, refreshingly, hiring advisers who aren’t entrenched in any political machine.”

Townhall.com’s Guy Benson observes:

Glassner’s comments certainly leave the distinct impression that Palin is gearing up for a run, do they not? (1) Taking a shot at a possible future adversary is par for the course in early presidential skirmishes, and (2) how many non-politician pundits have chiefs of staff bragging to reporters about the quality and independence of the advisers they’re hiring?

If Palin gets in, and Rove makes it his mission to stop her, Republicans should brace for a historic rumble. Democrats would likely enjoy every minute of the internecine feud, but would be well-served to remember that a nasty, protracted intra-party fight does not guarantee political success for the opposing party.

The competition between grassroots libertarian-leaning conservatives and establishment Republicans goes back much earlier than the week before the 2010 mid-term election, when Rove, seemingly from out of deep left field, abruptly attacked Gov. Palin for her eight-week TLC series “Sarah Palin’s Alaska.” It also goes far to the southwest of the Washington Beltway, all the way to the heart of the Lone Star State.

Over two years ago, then Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison, with the support of the Bush wing of the GOP, challenged Rick Perry for the governorship of Texas. Unlike the Bushies, who feared the grassroots phenomenon known as the Tea Party, Perry embraced the movement:

What resulted was a preview of the GOP–versus–tea party civil war. Dave ­Carney, Perry’s top strategist, attacked Rove as a “country club” Republican. Conversely, ­Sarah Palin, tea-party heroine, endorsed Rick Perry, calling him a “true conservative.”

Perry handily destroyed Hutchison in the primary.

“The Bushes are out of contact with what Texas is about,” says a veteran Republican politico who is close friends with Rick Perry. “So is Karl.”

Rove is the embodiment of everything the tea party resents. He supported Bush’s decision to bail out the banks in 2008, a major bone of contention with deficit hawks. And it was Rove, as White House political adviser, who pushed for some of the most expensive Bush programs, like the ­Medicare-prescription-drug bill, the passage of which cornered the troublesome State of Florida for Bush in 2004 but has already cost more than $1 trillion. The national debt nearly doubled under Bush, from $5.7 trillion to $10.6 trillion.

Hutchison’s devastating loss hit Rove hard, as he was working behind the scenes on her behalf, and her campaign’s dismal failure put a large dent in the Rovian myth of invincibility. Though he has long labored to build a power base from which to control GOP politics in the post-Bush era, Rove lost a lot of followers along the way and now faces some serious competition:

…the Koch brothers, David and Charles, the major tea-party underwriters who are promising to raise $88 million for the presidential elections, posing a populist alternative to Rove’s Establishment stronghold and making inroads with their support of Governor Scott Walker in Wisconsin and funding of counterprotests there. It’s not inconsequential: Major Republican donors told me they were disappointed by Rove’s comments about Palin. “He’s not right all the time,” one of them noted.

The Brothers Koch, like many conservatives, were sorely disappointed in the Bush presidency as administered by Rove. The Bush tax cuts were an outstanding achievement, but the failure to couple them with corresponding cuts in federal spending are a major reason why the deficit doubled under Bush. That the Bush deficits quadrupled under Barack Obama in less than two years time just rubs salt into the wing.

Like Sarah Palin, the Kochs have a libertarian streak, which explains their support of the Cato Institute, and though no clear lines have yet been drawn between the brothers and Gov. Palin, it’s interesting that they own oil refineries in Texas and Alaska and control about four thousand miles of pipeline. The two are into paper products as well. Just a few of the familiar products produced by companies they own are Brawny towels, Dixie cups and Georgia-Pacific lumber. Surely the well-known Palin libertarian streak is an asset the brothers must find appealing, and the fact that the Bushies hate her so much likely doesn’t hurt her standing in the eyes of the Kochs.

One thing is certain: if the Koch brothers are favorably disposed toward a Palin presidential run, the large donor requirement will not be a problem for the 2008 vice presidential candidate in 2012. It’s not just their own money which could help fuel a Palin candidacy. A number of other major donors will lay down their contributions where they see the brothers putting theirs. No wonder “progressives” are so afraid of the political influence of the Koch Brothers. The left has recently launched a campaign to make sure that the pair are cited frequently as the focus of evil which stands against every imaginable liberal policy issue. George Soros may have met his match, and Karl Rove most certainly has met his.

Related: Charles G. Koch: Why Koch Industries Is Speaking Out

Cross-posted from Texas for Sarah Palin

- JP

Posted in establishment, GOP, grassroots, Republican Party, Sarah Palin, tea party | Tagged: , | 1 Comment »

CNN: Giuliani vs. Palin in 2012?

Posted by joshpainter on January 22, 2011

- by Josh Painter
*
Rudy Giuliani says he’s actually “more likely” to run for president if Sarah Palin does:

In an interview on CNN’s “Piers Morgan Tonight,” Giuliani, who dropped out of the 2008 Republican presidential primary, said running against Palin for the 2012 GOP nomination would show him as a moderate Republican.

“The more Republicans in which I can show a contrast, probably the better chance, the better chance that I have,” Giuliani told CNN’s Piers Morgan in an interview set to air at 9 pm. ET Monday.

[...]

He also addressed Palin’s use of the word “blood libel” that she used in a video following the Arizona shootings. The phrase traditionally refers to a long-standing anti-Semitic myth that Jews murdered children for religious rituals. In present times, the term has come to be understood by some as any false accusation of murder.

Palin used it to criticize many in the media who said her political rhetoric may have contributed to the shootings. She later said her critics were taking issue with the phrasing in hopes of derailing her overall message.

Giuliani said “except for the use of the word, (she was) absolutely right on.”

Rudy is right about one thing — there would certainly be a contrast between the two if both got into the race.

Giuliani has a pro-abortion record, including support of taxpayer-funded abortions and refusal to ban late-term abortions. He also supports the federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. In a high profile case, he sued firearms manufacturers to try to hold them liable for gun violence. Rudy is also something of a flip-flopper, who praised RFK in his law school newspaper and bashed Barry Goldwater. While that can be chalked up to youthful ignorance, his pivot on school prayer is more problematic. Giuliani condemned a New York City public schoolteacher who led her class in prayer, but sent out fundraising letters in 1999 in which he portrayed himself as favoring of school prayer. He was for amnesty for illegal aliens before he was against it, and reissued Ed Koch’s executive order making NYC a sanctuary city for illegals . He also opposed George H.W. Bush’s ban on gay marriage, but in his 2000 campaign for the Senate said that marriage should be between one man and one woman.

Gov. Palin is fiercely pro-life, has always believed marriage is defined as one man and one woman and opposes embryonic stem cell research. She has received a number of awards from the NRA for her support of the Second Amendment. Although she’s not against some sort of path to citizenship for illegal immigrants, she rejects amnesty for them. Gov. Palin has always been suuportive of conservatives, from Goldwater to Jim DeMint and Paul Ryan. She has also been far more consistent on the issues than Giuliani. She has always supported school prayer and opposed gay marriage.

Yes, there are enough clear-cut differences between Rudy G and Gov. Palin on the issues that we say, Bring it on!

Cross-posted from Texas for Sarah Palin

- JP

Posted in 2012, Republican Party, Sarah Palin | 1 Comment »

Sarah’s PAC ties Mitt’s PAC in cash on hand

Posted by joshpainter on January 22, 2011

- by Josh Painter
*
Via ABC News:

Although Romney’s raised more money last year, both PACs are sitting on about the same amount of cash…

Mitt Romney:
PAC: Free and Strong America PAC, Inc.
Total 2010 Receipts (from Oct. report): $4,614,790.08
Cash on Hand (from Oct. report): $1,341,906.13

Sarah Palin:
PAC: SarahPac
Total 2010 Receipts (from Oct. report): $2,501,652.04
Cash on Hand (from Oct. report): $1,277,433.92

h/t: Mitch Daniels fan Don Surber

Cross-posted from Texas for Sarah Palin

- JP

Posted in Mitt Romney, Republican Party, Sarah Palin, SarahPAC | 1 Comment »

Sarah Palin Passes On RNC

Posted by Jackie Siciliano on December 6, 2010

Interesting. I say, “Sarah, keep your eye on the prize”.

From http://www.abcnews.com:

ABC News’ John Berman and Mary Bruce report:

Sarah Palin isn’t running…for one job at least. She doesn’t appear to be a candidate to Chair the Republican National Committee.

The activist group Tea Party Nation, planned on sending a letter to Palin pleading for her to run.

“We need you as Chairman of the RNC. You have shown in the past no hesitation to take on the establishment,” reads a draft of the letter posted on the Tea Party Nation web-site. “You did it in Alaska. If we end up with establishment control of the GOP and their support for an establishment candidate in 2012, Obama and the socialists will have won.”

But in an exclusive written statement to ABC News, Palin says:

“I respect the desire to have someone in charge of the RNC who understands the wishes of the conservative grassroots and understands that power resides with the people and not the vested interests in DC. However, the primary role of the RNC chair seems be that of fundraiser-in-chief, and there are others who would probably be much more comfortable asking people for money than I would be, and they would definitely enjoy it more.” More

Cross-posted from Sarah Palin Blog

Posted in campaign, candidate, Republican Party, RNC, Sarah Palin | Leave a Comment »

Phase One: The People Have Spoken

Posted by reagantman on November 3, 2010

-from Patrick’s World USA

You can tell by the President’s tone and the questions the press corp asked that word is out. The people are being heard. However, this is just one step, one phase, of the restoration of America to greatness that is so needed at this time. And again, he heard. Does it mean he gets it? That’s something we can’t wait to find out. It took a lot of “political bloodshead” just to get him to hear us. There is a lot more work to be done. Phase one is the people have spoken. Phase 2 will come when the people have acted.

As newly elected Senators and Representatives go to Congress next year, they will be tempted by the apple of power. They will be invited to drink the Potomoc water. It will be here where the test will either be passed or failed.

President Obama has told us what his side is going to do. They believe in their principles and they don’t want to compromise on the core stuff. He said he would be willing to take Republican ideas such as fixing the small business 1099 provision in the Health Care law to reduce the paperwork and bureaucratic burdens. We know the President is good at words. He seems to have learned some kind of lesson from this. But don’t sit back now thinking he’s going to give in.

This whole thing is not about compromise. It’s about principles. What we learned last night is that there are still two distinct groups in America who are not willing to compromise on those principles. Do we continue down the road of vicious discourse and the politics of personal destruction or do we foster an environment where compromise is not horse trading, but more like pragmatic bull riding?

There are lessons for all of us to learn from this. The Democrats found out that if they don’t listen to the will of the people, they’re out. The establishment Republicans have learned that if they complain about the candidates that have come out of the political process, particularly Tea Party candidates, they harm their chances for 2012. The Tea Party has learned that they are the truest and purist in the philosophy that is needed to get this country back to its Constitutional roots but that they are not always the most prettiest, most savvy or “best dressed” candidates.

It’s time for the Democrats to be the ones who do the compromising. It’s time for the Republican establishment to welcome the Tea Party into the tent and show them around. It’s time for the Tea Party to learn how to turn the levers of power.

Power works like anything else. There is a science to it. It, in and of itself, is not a bad thing. But power corrupts when those who work the wheels are they themselves corrupt. And in this regard, the Tea Party has a major point about the GOP establishment.

In fairness to the GOP establishment, it’s understandable that they would be concerned about people who have never worked the wheels before having to go from a field where dirt flies in the breeze between the Gadsden flags to the inner halls of Congress where a certain decorum and demeanor are required to work those wheels and where actual governing decisions need to be made.

But it is here that the GOP establishment has a crossroads moment in how they are going to treat the future of the Republican Party. If they don’t see this influx of the grassroots as its party’s future, they are destined to watch the party go the way of the Whigs. If the GOP establishment wants to “Bogart” the wheels of power and continue with business as usual in order to protect their own inner power structure, the principled newbies are not only going to be ineffective. They will leave the party.

This is a second chance for Republicans to be what they said they would be not so long ago, Marco Rubio said. The last thing America needs is its most principled people and its most Constitutionally conservative members to be demotivated by criticism that “they don’t clean up well.” If they pull out, it will create the vacuum that will result in the “Pottersvilling” of America. We were almost there in 2008. If it was not for the Tea Party, we’d probably be beyond the turnaround point by now. All hope for restoration would be gone.

If the Republican establishment is smart, it will open the hood, hand the Tea Party a wrench and say “let’s get to work.” There are some mechanical things the Tea Party can learn from the establishment.  But when the establishment tries to take a short cut, rig the job or compromise on the value of the workmanship that goes on under that hood, it’s time for the Tea Party to say “nope, we’re going to do the job right this time.”

It’s time for the Republican Party to ride the tiger, not beat it. It’s time for “the establishment” to begin to hand it over to the next generation, the “new establishment” that will be made up of mature Tea Partiers when the time is right.

If the establishment sees the Tea Party as a threat and tries to knee-cap it, or if it looks down on the Tea Party in a condescending manner, the battle to beat the liberals and to take back the Shining City on a Hill will be severely compromised and our energy will be diverted from the task at hand.

Christine O’Donnell gave a great example of this on the talk shows this morning. According to the New York Daily News:

[O'Donnell] said she wished the state and national Republican party backed her more enthusiastically during the campaign.

“I think the only thing that really would have made a difference is if the Delaware GOP had unified,” O’Donnell told “Good Morning America.” “Unfortunately, that still hasn’t happened.”

Amy Kremer, chairwoman of the Tea Party Express told Megyn Kelly on Fox News Channel that the Tea Party is proud of the work it has done and will continue to work toward electing conservative candidates and getting the Republican Party to move back to its platform.

The fact that the punditry and some inside the GOP establishment are saying that the Tea Party is a double edged sword or that they hurt the party’s chances of picking up more seats do nothing to positively help either the cause of the GOP or the cause of the Tea Party.

Consider that the GOP establishment also fielded candidates who lost and consider the simple nature of the beast that you can’t win them all. Winning every seat is like winning a football pool. You might do well, but there will always be a field goal kicker, a quarterback or some stupid play that costs you a game here and a game there. Recognizing life for what it is and being thankful for the victories the GOP had last night is too positive a suggestion even for those among our own ranks who would choose to complain and point fingers.

Sarah Palin pointed out that CNN exit polls show that if Mike Castle had been the Delaware GOP candidate, he, too, would have lost to Coons.

How is it possible that Harry Reid, who had some of the lowest approval ratings for a candidate going into last night could still win?

Don’t blame the Tea Party. Understand the nature of the beast before you beat it with a stick.

For over a century here in the United States and for centuries in Europe, people who have clustered into big cities and high population centers have always had a need to be told what to do. It is normal human belief that when large groups of people live in such close quarters that there needs to be rules and codes of conduct. And for centuries they have chosen their leaders to be both nanny and disciplinarian.

In more open areas where there is more of a rural or pioneering type setting, people tend to want to self-regulate. They don’t want groups or other people to tell them how to live, what to do with their land and most of all don’t want themselves being forced to give up things that they earn from the sweat of their own brow so that people can live comfortably in large cities where services and peaceful living are considered entitlements rather than issues of personal responsibility.

When Carly Fiorina, Meg Whitman and Sharon Angle lose their elections, it’s not because they were horrible candidates chosen by the Tea Party. It’s because they were candidates who shook up the big city mentality and got a lot of people thinking during an election which, if it had been run at any other time than now, would have easily been won by the liberal candidates with no further discussion from the talking heads. The fact that Barbara Boxer, Jerry Brown and Harry Reid had to fight for their lives against “such inferior candidates” says a lot more than many want to admit at a time where sore losership trumps clearer thinking on the GOP side.

Winning in 2012 and beyond is going to take more thought than just whining about choosing electable candidates. Let’s face it. An electable candidate in Texas or Kentucky may not be an electable candidate in New York or California. “That O’Donnell and Whitman performed roughly the same despite the fact that O’Donnell characterized herself as a Tea Party conservative while Whitman characterized herself as a moderate should tell everyone that the deep blue hue of California and Delaware mattered more than anything related to the Tea Party,” writes Ian Lazaran at Conservatives4Palin.

What should be more frustrating to the GOP establishment than the quality of candidates fielded should be the colors on the map. Nothing burns a conservative more than looking at a map where all the precincts are red except for a few small blue spots that just happen to be near or in the inner cities and then they look up at the election numbers and see their candidate down by 4%.

It is the failure of the GOP to recognize that while we are successful at open field hilltop to hilltop political combat, we simply suck at urban house to house warfare.

No one is saying the GOP shouldn’t be working on finding the best candidates. Candidate training is a part of the Tea Party movement. If the GOP can help out rather than lash out, maybe this can be achieved more quickly.

But more importantly, beyond focusing on changing the quality of their candidates, the GOP and Tea Party should be working on winning over the hearts and minds of the city people with cluster mentalities that have lead them to a false sense of security based on their beliefs that a nanny state federal government is the same as having a well run apartment complex with a good super or a community with a good association whose rules keep the quality of life nice.

These are the people who need to be convinced that local government is the best government. It is these people who need to believe that the GOP is not out to take away their essential services or interfere with their social lives. Instead, they need to be empowered to pay for these services themselves and live their lives as they see fit without coming to the federal government with their hands out or a laundry list of laws that ask others who are not like them in other areas of the country to conform to.

There are two philosophies. The inner city philosophy of top down rule and the rural more outside suburbanite philosophy of small limited government with bottom up rule. These will always clash unless those with the inner city mentalities who vote liberal like lemmings can be convinced that their lives will be much better off once they are weaned off the teet of the federal government (and ultimately unwilling taxpayers who don’t live in or near the big cities).

The Shining City on a Hill need not be polished off the sweat of the brows of those who live in the valleys. Those who live in the city need to take responsibility for their own pad or plot and take pride in their communities and complex enough to believe that we are all capable of making the country a better place when we stop micro-managing  and over-complicating things and take a more common sense approach to solving our problems.

The Tea Party has a lot of work to do, not because they are doing things wrong, but because there is a lot more right that needs to be done. It now needs to hold the candidates who were just elected accountable and see to it that it continues to improve as we head into 2012. We’ve come a long way since the Tea Party was a rag tag army of sign waving Gadsden flag holding members of the “mob” in a field protesting the government. Those who criticize them today fail to recognize the potential for tomorrow.

The time has come to continue to move forward. We’ve done so much good so far.

We had a great victory last night. But it was a politically bloody battle. We took casualties. We crushed our opponents. We took the gavel from Pelosi. We took Obama’s Senate seat. We won crucial governorships in Ohio and Florida among other states. We achieved the ultimate objective of taking the House.

Yes, we didn’t take out Harry Reid. Yes, we lost Sharron Angle and Christine O’Donnell. Miller and Rossi may also be lost. Carly Fiorina was badly wounded, but she will be back. It wasn’t a totally pretty win. But it was a solid win.

It was also the next phase in the evolution of Sarah Palin whose great victories give her more clout than ever before and whose toughest losses give her a more clearer and more concise picture of what needs to be fixed as she moves forward to possibly running for president in 2012. These are all good things. If someone wants to shoot off their mouths and criticize the Tea Party or criticize Sarah Palin, that is simply stinking thinking. Success is not a destination, but rather a journey. Statues have been erected for those who have succeeded in the past. But you never see a statue erected for a critic.

It’s time to move forward. We are advancing. Stage 2 is the big one. And, it’s only two years away.

Enjoy the banquet today. Tomorrow we saddle up for the next big battle.

For more, check out this excellent article by Cubachi:
Last night was a win for the Tea Party, conservatism, and mama grizzlies

Posted in Governor Sarah Palin, politics, Republican, Republican Party, Sarah Palin, tea party, Tea Party Express | Tagged: | Leave a Comment »

 
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